Tag Archives: business

Happy Cyborg Monday!

Robot Editor

This is not a Cyborg

Hey, wow! To celebrate Cyborg Monday*, you can download all my ebooks from Amazon for free for the day!

If interested, you can read a sample and download them from here.

And as always, thank you for shopping at Amazon where your feedback in the form of reviews are always welcomed (and desired).

#prayforthesingularity

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*It’s obvious to me, seeing how Jeff Bezos is embracing Cyborgs and dedicating an entire day of discounts and savings in their honor, that he doesn’t fear the AI Apocalypse quite as much as his billionaire bud Elon Musk does.

 

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#WOMENSHISTORYMONTH

WOMENSHISTORYMONTH.GOV

National Women’s History Month 2017 Theme:
“Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business”

NWHP.ORG

★ ★ ★

Japan’s Business Federation Sent This All-Female Delegation to the Trump White House

 

Journey Delayed Due to an Inclement Life

If you live long enough, the chances are pretty good you – your faith; your hopes; your dreams – will be tested. There is no way to predict what your test may be – the possibilities are infinite – but the results are always the same: life changing.

Mine came in the form of life-threatening illnesses.

Author Lucille Anderson’s came with the washing away of a life of love and comfort when she lost her business, her father, and her marriage. I strongly encourage you to visit with Lucille to learn more about her test, her testimony, and the lessons she has to share at her website and in her newly released book Habakkuk: The Cry of Crisis the Song of Victory

Life in 3-D Coaching

My definition of being lost is not knowing how you got  where you are, and how to get to where you want to be. That is where I found myself over ten years ago –lost. Oh, I knew that I was making some wrong and some bad turns, so, I can’t completely say that I didn’t know how I got  where I was. But, I’m the victim here, so I don’t have to take responsibility for my part in this, yet.

Just to remind you, or if you are just catching up, these are the circumstances that I am speaking of. In August, 2004, I gave up on trying to keep my business open any longer after a 14 year -successful run. The man whom I was married to walked out two months later (mmm, I wonder if there was a connection). Oh, yes, and I lost my dad in…

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INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: Celebrating the Success Worldwide

I don’t normally do this kind of thing but, because this is a day to celebrate the grand achievements women all around the world are making, and because this is such phenomenal information (albeit excessively long and highly wonky), I am sharing this cut and paste from the National Business Women’s Council, a US Government organization*.

My summary of this Executive Summary of a US Census Survey regarding US Business is that basically what follows is the empirical data/evidence of what I see happening in all sectors of US society… especially that of the Publishing Industry.

And that is…

WOMEN. ARE. CRUSHING. IT!

Yeah…

The King is dead…

Long live the Queen!
 
*As I understand it, unless specifically marked, anything produced by the US Government is in the Public Domain and free to use. Howeever, if you are planning on doing any copy and pastes of anything you do not own the copyright to, learn the rules first for yourself before you do. I am not a copyright lawyer so do not take my word for it. See my Terms of Use page for more on this.



The Growth and Development of Women-Owned Enterprises in the United States, 2002 – 2012: An Analysis of Trends from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Business Owners

Women continue to enter into the ranks of business ownership at rates exceeding the national average. Indeed, the rate at which women are launching businesses is on the rise.

  • As of 2012, there are nearly 10 million women-owned businesses[1} in the United States. These enterprises employ over eight million workers and generate over $1.4 trillion in revenues.
  • Between 2002 and 2012, the number of women-owned firms increased at a rate 2-1/2 times the national average (52% vs. 20%), employment in women-owned firms grew at a rate 4-1/2 times that of all firms (18% vs. just 4%), and the growth in revenues generated by women-owned firms paralleled that of all firms (up 51% compared to 48%).
  • The pace of business formation among women is on the rise. Between 1997 and 2002, the number of women-owned firms grew by 20%, as it did between 2002 and 2007. Then, between 2007 and 2012, the number of women-owned firms increased by 27% – a significant uptick in business start-ups.
  • On average, between 2002 and 2012, women launched an average of 928 net new firms each and every day. Within that ten-year period, there were an average of 714 net new women-owned firms per day between 2002 and 2007, and 1,143 per day between 2007 and 2012.

While more and more women are starting businesses, those businesses remain significantly smaller than average.

  • Women-owned businesses comprise 36% of the country’s businesses, employ 7% of the private-sector workforce, and contribute 4% of business revenues. Ten years prior, women-owned firms represented a smaller 28% of the country’s businesses, but contributed a similar share of employment (7%) and revenues (4%).
  • In terms of employment, fully 91% of women-owned firms have no employees other than the owner, and just 2% have 10 or more employees. Women-owned firms with 10 or more employees provide three-quarters of the jobs provided by women-owned firms. While most women-owned firms remain small in terms of employment, it should be pointed out that the number of women-owned employer firms (which now numbers over one million) has increased by 13% between 2002 and 2012, while overall the number of U.S. employer firms has declined by 1.8% over the same period.
  • With respect to revenue size, 82% of women-owned firms generate less than $100,000 in annual revenues, and just 3% generate $500,000 or more in revenues. This top 3% of women-owned firms accounts for three-quarters of the revenues generated by women-owned businesses. Further, it should be noted that – while less than 2% of women-owned firms generate $1 million or more in revenues – the number of those firms increased by 47% between 2002 and 2012, compared to an 18% increase among all million-dollar enterprises.
  • The average revenue per woman-owned firm is $143,731. This compares to average revenues of $440,190 among all privately-held firms and $1,213,944 among all firms – which includes large, publicly-traded firms (which average $48.2 million in per-firm revenues).

Perhaps the most remarkable trend in women’s entrepreneurship seen over the past decade is the phenomenal growth in business ownership among women of color.

  • In 2002, there were fewer than one million (909,321) minority women-owned firms in the U.S., representing 14% of women-owned firms. As of 2012, there are nearly 3.8 million firms owned by women of color, comprising 38% of women-owned businesses.
  • Between 2002 and 2012, when the number of women-owned firms overall increased by 52%, the number of non-minority women-owned firms grew by just 9%, while the number of minority women-owned firms overall grew by 315% – a quadrupling in numbers. Specifically, the number of Native American/Alaska Native women-owned businesses increased by 67%, the number of Asian American women-owned businesses more than doubled (up 121%), the number of Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander women-owned businesses increased by 136%, and the number of Latina-owned businesses nearly tripled (up 172%) – as did the number of African American women-owned businesses (up 178%).
  • As of 2012, there are 1,521,494 African American women-owned firms in the U.S., 1,469,991 Latina-owned firms, 749,197 Asian American women-owned firms, 131,064 Native American/Alaska Native women-owned firms, and 24,982 Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander women-owned firms in the U.S.

As the number of women serving in the military has grown, so has the number of female veteran-owned enterprises – at a rate exceeding even that of minority women-owned businesses.

  • In 2007, there were 97,114 veteran women-owned firms in the U.S., representing 4% of all veteran-owned firms. As of 2012, there are 383,302 veteran women-owned firms, comprising 15% of all veteran-owned firms.
  • Between 2007 and 2012, when the number of all veteran-owned businesses increased by 3% – from 2.4 to 2.5 million – the number of female veteran-owned businesses increased by a phenomenal 295%, a near quadrupling in numbers in just five years.

Regionally, the sharpest rise in the number of women-owned firms has been seen in the southern region of the U.S., where overall population growth has been the strongest. However, women-owned firms in the central part of the country have bounced back most strongly from the 2007-2009 recession.

  • Between 2002 and 2012, the greatest growth in the number of women-owned firms has been seen in Georgia (+92%), Mississippi (+89%), Texas (+85%), Florida (+85%), and Louisiana (+74%) – all Southern states. Indeed, all of the states where women-owned firm growth exceeds the national average by more than 10 points are in the South, except for Arizona and Nevada.
  • Four out of the five fastest-growing metropolitan areas for women-owned firms are also in the South: Memphis (+160%), Charlotte (+138%), Orlando (+127%), Las Vegas (+101%), and San Antonio (+101%).
  • While states in the South lead the way in business growth over the entire ten-year period, Central states are home to the most positive trends when comparing growth during the 2007-2012 post-recession period to the 2002-2007 pre-recession period. There are 19 states in which post-recession growth in the number of women-owned firms is at least 10 points higher than pre-recession growth; most are in the North Central or Midwest regions of the U.S. The leading “bounce back” states are Louisiana, Nebraska, Iowa, North Dakota, Indiana, and Mississippi. At the other end of the spectrum, ten states currently lag pre-recession growth rates – including Maine, Georgia, Hawaii, and New Hampshire, where post-recession growth is more than 5% lower than pre-recession growth.

As women business owners themselves are growing more diverse, so are the businesses that they are starting. Despite growing industry diversification, however, the largest concentration of women-owned firms is still seen in the most traditional areas of business ownership for women – sectors that have lower than average revenues per firm.

  • Women-owned firms are found in every industry. In fact, 2% or more of the nearly 10 million women-owned firms are found in 13 of the 19 major industries – including over 260,000 women-owned construction firms, over 200,000 women-owned finance and insurance firms, and nearly 160,000 women-owned transportation and warehousing enterprises.
  • Despite the growing diversity in the types of businesses that women own, nearly half (49%) of women-owned firms are found in three sectors: other services (1.9 million firms, within which there are nearly 1 million beauty and nail salons), health care and social assistance (1.6 million firms, within which there are over 600,000 child day care service businesses), and professional/scientific/technical services (1.3 million firms, within which there are a cornucopia of such firms as management and human resources consultancies, translation services, and veterinarians).
  • Between 2002 and 2012, the greatest growth in the number of women-owned firms has been in educational services (+91%), administrative services (+90%) and other services (+86%) – growth rates nearly double the overall 52% increase during the period. However, even within slower-growing industries, the rate of growth in the number of women-owned firms outpaces overall growth in every single industry sector.
  • Women-owned businesses are more likely than average to have achieved revenues of $500,000 or more in five industries: wholesale trade, manufacturing, accommodation and food services, construction, and transportation and warehousing. However, women-owned firms in these industries comprise only 11% of all women-owned firms.
  • Conversely, among some of the most populous sectors for women-owned businesses – most especially other services, administrative, support and waste management services and health care and social assistance, average revenues are well under $100,000 per firm. Raising the overall economic clout of women-owned businesses would then require a two-pronged approach:
  •         1. Assist women in the more populous, lower per-firm revenue sectors in scaling-up their enterprises, and
            2. Encourage more women to start businesses in the less populous but more likely to scale sectors.



     

    [1] Throughout this report, the term “women-owned” refers to enterprises that are at least 51% owned and operated by a woman or group of women. Businesses equally-owned by a man and a woman (or equal numbers of men and women) are not included – primarily because the way that equally-owned firms have been identified has differed in each of the past four business census years, thus precluding accurate trend analysis.

     
     

So, about this Snapchat #socialmedia thing…

I wonder…

Are any Indie Authors using it to promote their work?

And if they are, are they finding it worthy of the time and brain cells it took them to learn yet another social media thing for which to suck them away from their writing (not that I need it for an excuse to do that… I have many, many others from which to draw from)?

I am filled with such wonderment for this Snapchat thing from seeing more and more written about its value in marketing to the social media-consumed Millennials.

 
 

Need Help Publishing Your Book?

 
Inspired by a love of literature in specific and “The Arts” in general, as well as our very own Indie Author Book Selection & Review (IABS&R), it is my pleasure to introduce you to a long in planning yet new venture of mine, a venture of which is in possession of the entrepreneurial name of PROSOCHĒ (pronounced pro-so-hi) as legally registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of the United States of America and which is now open for business to all those of a literary nature world-wide.

In other words, I’ve founded a Literary Consultancy gig and I cordially invite you to consider my services as an option for expanding and enhancing your authorial endeavors.

Admittedly, in its present state the website is rather understated in looks and overstated in words, but it does embody that which I wish to convey and present to the world at this time.

And, as in much if not most of life, it is subject to change.

You can visit the site to learn all about it – like what in the heck does PROSOCHĒ even mean – but here are a couple key points I’d like to highlight for you right now:

– Long term I hope for PROSOCHĒ to be a full-scale Creativity Consultancy firm, catering to all “The Arts.” But as of the moment, it employs just yours truly and I am able to offer Literary Consultancy services in the form of manuscript proofing, editing, and other such things that can be found on the website.

– While I found that manuscript proofing and editing services can run into the thousands of dollars, I’ll be honest, I don’t really know what my services are worth at this time. I do believe I can provide some value, however, as is attested to by the testimonials found on the site, and I do believe it is worth a fee of some sort; but until I figure it all out, I am accepting as a fee whatever it is my select clientele, perhaps you, choose to pay.

I did mention that things are subject to change, right? Well the fee structure certainly will, and I imagine soon, so please keep that in mind if considering the services.

I also mentioned at the beginning of this post that PROSOCHĒ was partially inspired by the IABS&R. That inspiration came not so much from what has been advertised about the IABS&R here or from the reviews I have written in response to the selected texts; the inspiration came from that part of the IABS&R which you probably aren’t aware of, which is an email I send to the IABS&R authors that consist of detailed and expansive feedback of contextual, proofing, and editing recommendations based upon my close reading of the text. I believe these emails have been of more value to the authors than either the exposure they’ve received through this site or the reviews of their work I post here or elsewhere.

So, in addition to a deep understanding of the ins and outs of the world Indie Publishing, that is the crux of what I bring to PROSOCHĒ: my ability to give a manuscript a close read and provide its author a deep and extensive critique of it.

So, please check PROSOCHĒ out if you feel so inclined and just maybe we can work together on a project of yours.

Now, with the advent of PROSOCHĒ, does it mean the end for the IABS&R? The answer is most certainly not. In fact, I am getting ready to kick off Volume IV as I am already in receipt of three books – you’ll be seeing the Book Reveal posts of them very soon so if you’d like your hard copy book to be entered in this volume you better send it to me pronto as my selection will be in a month or so.

As always, there’s a lot going on, of which I am very happy and even more thankful for.

If you have any questions about PROSOCHĒ, please let me know about them by contacting me through the site’s Contact Page.

Thank you and, as always…

Write On!


PROSOCHĒ

The Art of Attention

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