With Eloquence: W. E. B. Du Bois

I published my first “With Eloquence” post last month with an excerpt from a very eloquent speech delivered by Booker T. Washington as a response to what I see as society’s writ large degenerating verbal and written communication skills.

The post was also intended to be a lead in for me to set up for this month a Relating to Humans all-call for submissions celebrating African-American History Month similar to what I did for last year’s Women’s History Month.

Well, like the reason for so many of my productivity issues lately – I blame Trump for knocking me dizzy with all his scary and/or moronic autocratic antics. thereby making me lose my focus.

Continue reading “With Eloquence: W. E. B. Du Bois”

With Eloquence: Booker T. Washington

Remember when we as a people wrote and spoke with informed eloquence?

Yeah, me neither…

But I was reminded such a fairy-tale time did, in fact, exist when watching former senator and Secretary of Defense William Cohen introduce retire Marine Corps General James “Mad Dog” Mattis to the Senate Armed Services Committee prior to its hearing regarding the general’s selection to be President-elect Trump’s Secretary of Defense. At the end of his introduction, which was eloquent in its own right, Cohen quoted from the famous 1884 Memorial Day Address delivered by the renowned law scholar, author, and orator Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Continue reading “With Eloquence: Booker T. Washington”

I and Me Confusing You and Yours

Still confused about the whole “me” or “I” thing, I see.

Listen, just slapping “I” in every sentence where there is a need for a pronoun for you isn’t going to make you seem smarter, my friend.

It will make you seem just the opposite to those who know the rules…

So what is the rule when it comes to “me” versus “I” usage?

Grammatically speaking, when you are the subject of a sentence, use “I.” When you are the object of a sentence, use “me.”

Yeah, I know… so what that means for you and me in plain English/American:

Simply take out the other name(s), noun(s), or pronoun(s) listed in the sentence with you and use whichever pronoun for you (I or me) you would normally use in the same sentence without them.

For instance:

A copy was given to Rick, Steve, and (me/I).

Copy is the subject. The people are the objects.

Without Rick and Steve in the sentence we would easily know to say:

A copy was given to me.

So, the correct sentence would read:

A copy was given to Rick, Steve, and me.

Another example:

Betty, Jane, and (me/I) are going to the library.

The three people are the subjects.

Without Betty and Jane, we of course would say:

I am going to the library.

So, the correct sentence would read:

Betty, Jane, and I are going to the library.

Piece of cake, right?

Of course it is. But that means you’ll have think (to do the grammar math) first before you speak so that may continue to cause you/us some problems.

Anyway…

Follow this simple grammar hack and you and me will get along just fine, my friend.

;)

 
 

me

Caption This! no.2

Caption This! no2
Your caption could be here

 

So I was getting ready to post this bleak photo with a haiku about how in order to be found we must first be lost or something lame like that…but then it dawned on me (I’ve always liked that saying…the visual of a thought of mine rising in my brain like the morning sun)…

Hey, this would be the perfect picture for another one of those caption contest thingies.

Am I right or am I right?!

Yes, of course I’m right…

Right?

Anyway…

Same rules apply as the last time:

Post your caption in the comments.

Caption with the most “Likes” wins.

Winning caption will be posted tomorrow sometime (probably in the A.M.-ish timeframe) and will look a little something like this.

Have fun!

Don’t forget to “Like” the caption(s) you like best!