“Post-apocalyptic fiction has been moved to our current affairs section”

I wish I were smart enough to be able to claim this post's eye/brain-catching headline as my own. But, alas, I cannot because I got it from this read-worthy #longread of an article written by John Feffer, a journalist and author who, with his read-worthy article, attempts to (in subtle sublimity) -- and in my …

Meet our 2016 National Book Award Winner

Colson Whitehead was born in 1969, and was raised in Manhattan. After graduating from Harvard College, he started working at the Village Voice, where he wrote reviews of television, books, and music... COLSONWHITEHEAD.COM 2016 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER “[A] potent, almost hallucinatory novel... It possesses the chilling matter-of-fact power of the slave narratives collected by …

From Author Dave Astor: Guest Literature Post by Donald Trump!

I was considering writing a satire post (i.e., FAKE Post!) with its premise being our so-called president writing it as a Guest Author.

As I was getting set to channel Trump for the writing, I got cold fingers, so to speak, from the damage the channeling might do to my so-called brain; so, I backed slowly away from the keyboard, thought about it for a minute, then made the decision to search around to see if anyone had already done something similar.

I’m happy to have lost my courage to allow my brain to think as a non-reading Trump would and I am awe at the courage author Dave Astor possesses and the risks he was willing to take to share his brain and blog with him, for his sacrifices have allowed us to enjoy this reblogged post of his.

If you’re a reader of such things as “books” that are written with more than 140 words and that may contain troubling brain hurdles such as nuance and non-linear plot and plotless constructs, then you must check out Mr. Astor’s witty and wise blog.

★★★

Dave Astor on Literature

This blog will be different today, because Donald Trump demanded to write a guest piece. I told him he doesn’t read literature or know much about it, but he insisted. Anyway, things will go back to normal next week, but until then…herrrrrre’s the illegitimate president:

The Donald (me) doesn’t read novels, but I do read the backs of cereal boxes. Lots of back story, ya know?

Actually, I know a yuge amount about fiction. Not the literary kind — the “alternative facts” kind.

I can’t deal with The Wings of the Dove. Why didn’t Henry James write The Wings of the War Hawk? Sad.

The Red Badge of Courage? Stephen Crane — what a loser. Believe me, I showed more courage getting Vietnam War deferments for alleged bone spurs in my heels, even though I played a ton of sports at the time with no problem. They…

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An Introduction to Author MB Bissett

In my last post “Hey Reader, What’s Your Angle,” I invited you all to share a link to a book that you’ve reviewed that provides some insight, via your writing, as to how you apply your critical thinking strategy towards the books you read.

I’m so happy that MB BLISSETT was kind/brave enough to take me up on the offer; for, not only did he introduce me to THE FEVER by Meg Abbott with his interesting and insightful review of her work, he introduced me to a new eclectic world of creativity and intellect that can be found all throughout his website.

After reading his review that I introduce here, I strongly urge you to then head straight to his About page as it is most interesting and entertaining – I read it and I feel a strong kinship with his outlook toward writing and his literary taste.

Comments are closed here so that you can share your thoughts directly with MB at his website.

MB Blissett

the-fever

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs posits that when base needs are met, then your desires become more refined. Which usually means that your fears probably work on the same level. If you’re not risking death every single time that you give birth, then you’re worried that they will live to be healthy adults and when they’re healthy adolescents, you’re worried about any number of factors. Within the haunted house of parenthood and adolescence, Megan Abbott knows where the ghosts live and shows them to you.

The Fever ably captures the beauty and passion, the terror, the contradictory desire for freedom and privacy, the secrets that women keep from themselves and one another. She uses social media and how it intertwines and defines the worlds of young people subtly and effectively. In the iconography of the modern world, the online video is the sermon, the blowing of the whistle or in this…

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A Review of Short Verses & Other Curses by Paul Xylinides of theliteraryreader

I am very proud and honored to have received such a warm review from the great Paul Xylinides of the theliteraryreader (theliteraryreader.com).

As you may be aware, Paul’s work is not unfamiliar to this site, as his THE WILD HORSES OF HIROSHIMA is reviewed here and is my favorite Indie Author read to date.

I strongly encourage you – it’s for your own good, believe me – to visit with Paul at both his literary review site and at his author site paulxylinides.com to check out the intellectually intriguing work he does. Make sure you follow his sites so you don’t miss out in the future.

To read my review of THE WILD HORSES OF HIROSHIMA, click here.

To read more of Paul’s writing found on this site, enter “paul xylinides” in the search box.

theliteraryreader

Short Verses

Review

of

Kurt Brindley’s

Short Verses & Other Curses
(Haiku, Senryū, & Other Poetic, Artistic, & Photographic Miscellany)

by

Paul Xylinides

paul_picture_03

A Warrior Poet’s Hard-Won Epiphanies

Self-made and/or naturally insight-endowed, Kurt Brindley has the soul of a poet; further, he has the soul of a warrior poet. He makes passing reference to the martial tradition that has also been a part of his life in the poem “If I Were A Samurai:”


I would know

when to bow
and when to ignore
when to speak
and when to be silent

when to eat
and when to fast
when to think
and when to meditate
when to advance
and when to hold
when to strike
and when to parry
when to kill
and when to die

All writers — the serious and the not-so-much — inevitably find themselves in a battle, as often as not Biblical in proportions, for the human…

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Marvel Shmarvel – the real Super Heroes are the Volunteer Readers for #TeamLibriVox

And the Super Hero In Chief at LibriVox is the... Amazing... Spectacular... Sublime... One And Only... Able To Read the Densest Tomes Without Once Tying The Tongue... Mr. Bob Neufeld Seriously folks, if you love classic literature and love to listen to classic voice actors, you need to check out Bob Neufeld's grand body of …

A Poetic Response to our Occult Relationship with the Vegetable as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The greatest delight which the fields and woods minister, is the suggestion of an occult relation between man and the vegetable. I am not alone and unacknowledged. They nod to me, and I to them. The waving of the boughs in the storm, is new to me and old. It takes me by surprise, and …

A Meditation on an Introduction’s Second Paragraph as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Having moved slow and steady through two readings of Nature, with nightly accompaniments of Librivox audio readings that would lull me away to sleep with visions of all the vast universal wonderments dancing in my head, it is now time to sift through my sporadic notes and swirling thoughts to try to make use of …

A Meditation on a Title and an Introductory Poem as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

A subtle chain of countless rings The next unto the farthest brings; The eye reads omens where it goes; And speaks all languages of the rose; And, striving to be man, the worm Mounts through all the spires of form   Too often I'll show little regard to introductions and read through them with hardly …

A Story For the Misaligned, Sailor Or Otherwise

  From the Dedication Page: This book is dedicated to anyone -- regardless of race, ethnicity, sex, gender and all its breathless facets, sexual orientation, non-sexual orientation, sexual non-orientation, spirituality or lack thereof, religion or lack thereof, nationality or lack thereof, political affiliation or lack thereof, occupation or lack thereof, education or lack thereof, good …

THE WILD HORSES OF HIROSHIMA – The Big Reveal!

In my view, it's always pretty awesome around here, especially since we kicked off the Indie Author Book Selection & Review and Relating to Humans features a while back. But this week has been especially awesome. For this week we have witnessed the original thinking, compelling insight, and unique writing style of Indie Author Paul …

Summing Up Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE

I suppose the easiest, and quickest, way to sum up Maugham's Of Human Bondage would be to write something along the lines of "most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them," which appears to be the case for the story's protagonist Phillip Carey.

In Contemplation of the Art and Act of Suicide – A Review

SHORT STORY | FICTION | LITERATURE A NOTE by John Northcutt Young RATING: ★ ★ ★   Some people should die That's just unconscious knowledge - Jane's Addiction   It is hard for me to imagine anyone past the age of puberty who has not contemplated suicide. I don't mean actually contemplating committing suicide -- …

British Library Puts More Than a Thousand of Its ‘Greatest Literary Treasures’ Online

Something to be excited about…

TIME

The British Library launched a new website Friday where people from around the world can now admire some of its “greatest literary treasures.”

The site is expected to become the biggest digital English literature collection, the Library says. Manuscripts of “Jane Eyre,” the preface to Dickens’s “Oliver Twist,” and an early draft of Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest” as well as William Blake’s notebook, including drafts of his iconic poems “London” and ‘The Tyger,” are among the collection’s highlights.

The selection focuses on the Romantic and Victorian periods, and also includes the manuscripts of Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Austen, Dickens and Wilde as well as the largest collection of childhood writings of the Brontë sisters.

The British Library had commissioned a survey of over 500 secondary school teachers asking how they think English literature is perceived by young people. Three quarters of teachers say that their…

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