The Indelible Shining

Great movie despite Stephen King’s protestations* — it’s one of those rare occasions when the movie out shines, so to speak, the book, which I found mostly laughable and long (as I do with most of King’s books) — and despite the horrible decision to cast Shelley Duvall, which, of course, resulted in her horrible acting. Kubrick abused the hell out of her during production because of it.


Pauline Kael wrote in the New Yorker that Kubrick’s devotion to technique distanced the audience from the domestic horrors of his story. The Washington Post called it “elaborately ineffective.” Gene Siskel said it was “boring” and occasionally “downright embarrassing.” Toronto’s Globe & Mail: an “overreaching, multi-levelled botch.” In its first year of existence, the bad movie-centric Razzie Awards nominated The Shining for worst director and worst actress.

From unloved curiosity to beloved classic: The surprising 40-year legacy of Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, INLANDER, May 21, 2020

#allworkandnoplaymakeskurtrethinkhispriorities


*Spoilers of both book and movie

Pulitzer Prize Winners

Congratulations to a bunch of writers I’ve never heard of who’ve written a bunch of books I’ll never read.

(The obvious hyperbole serves only to mask the bitter envy)…

Click on the image or visit pulitzer.org for the complete list

#alonetogetherwritingthenextpulitzerwinner

The Bogart Advantage

It’s a close call but this might be one of those rare instances where the movie outperforms the book. The flick does have an unfair advantage though with Bogart as the lead…


For a crash course on a category that can be hard to pin down, Nicholas Ray’s psychologically complex “In a Lonely Place” has it all, starting with a sneering Bogart.

Even trying to categorize “In a Lonely Place” is tricky: It has elements of murder mystery, melodrama and Hollywood insider scoop. Yet it is certainly one of the most forthright films to deal with domestic abuse ever to come from a major production company, let alone in the early 1950s. Here is a movie so rough-minded, so willing to be unsympathetic that it opens with its protagonist, a screenwriter named Dixon Steele (Humphrey Bogart), threatening to get into a brawl with a stranger.

New York Times , April 30, 2020

THE BOGART SUSPENSE PICTURE WITH THE SURPRISE FINISH – (original tag line)

A classic California noir with a feminist twist, this prescient 1947 novel exposed misogyny in post-World War II American society, making it far ahead of its time. [Amazon Publisher description]

#alonetogetherinalonelyplace

Shelter In Place and Read!

Hey, there. It’s been a while so I just wanted to check in to see how you’re doing during this post-apocalyptic world of bad fiction it seems we’re living in.

I assume you’ve been reading, a lot, during this extended vacation Mother Nature has forced upon many of us, so I figured I’d give you something else to put in your depleted TBR queue.

THE GOOD KILL is free from today through Wednesday at Amazon just for you.

Snag a copy right here >> https://amzn.to/3bWfOgF

THE GOOD KILL
In this action-filled thriller, a former Navy SEAL turned vigilante hitman finds trouble after rescuing a sex trafficking victim against her will…

Anyway, I’ve been working mightily on new material. Unfortunately, I’m not coordinated enough to be able to focus on a WIP and on blogging regularly so I’m not sure when I’m going to check back in on you.

So, until then…

Stay Safe!

Stay Positive!

Stay Home!

🙏🏻

A GATHERING OF BUTTERFLIES by Sean C. Wright – A Review

BOOK | FICTION | SHORT STORIES
A GATHERING OF BUTTERFLIES by Sean C. Wright
RATING: ★ ★ ★ ★


Tales of steely but vulnerable women of color will melt your heart while lifting your spirits…

A fierce grandmother keeps her grandson from the clutches of Old Scratch in Devil Does Dallas.

An alien abduction transforms a large, miserable woman in Hazel Hogan.

A country girl meets a city girl on her birthday, and struggles to decide if the girl’s heart is dark or light in Bubble Bath Twelve.

And methodical Genie forms an unlikely relationship in Heaven’s Halfway House while in a coma.

Book Description from Amazon
Continue reading “A GATHERING OF BUTTERFLIES by Sean C. Wright – A Review”

THE GOOD KILL – A Review by Cathy Geha

I’d like to thank Ms. Cathy Geha of Cathy’s World for her review of The Good Kill. Cathy had, fortunately for me, come across the book at NetGalley.

Her’s is the forth review I’ve received from the site, which is pretty cool. It’s been downloaded from there over 50 times so hopefully we’ll see more than a few more as a time goes on. Fingers crossed.

Help me show my appreciation for Cathy’s review, and all the other many reviews she has prepared for us, by visiting her site and spending some time there with her.

CATHYGEHA.TUMBLR.COM

THE GOOD KILL – A Review by Sean C. Wright

A hearty and heartfelt thank you to Ms. Sean C. Wright — AKA Seanarchy; AKA Lady Rougepen (cool AKAs) — for her recent review of my latest novel THE GOOD KILL.

You may remember Sean from her recent win of a little flash fiction contest I held a while back. For her literary prowess, she was awarded a copy of The Good Kill signed my yours truly. I may have included a haiku along with it… can’t recall for certain.

Anyway, maybe it’s time to hold another of those flash fiction contests, eh… I enjoy hosting them.

Coincidentally (Yes, Amazon, coincidentally), you may have noticed that one of Sean’s books is on my current reads list. I imagine you can expect a review of it posted on my blog sometime soon (I am a very slow, distracted reader so soon is a relative term).

So give Sean’s cool and quirky website a visit and check out all the good stuff she has to offer there, including more of her award-winning flash fiction and other literary wonders.

Seanarchy

IMG_4717.jpgTitle: The Good Kill

Author: Kurt Brindley

Genre: Action

Length: 392 pages

Action? Check. Lone wolf hero with a tragic flaw? Check. Strong women? Check.

This action-packed book grabs you by the throat from the beginning. It does it firmly, but not to preachily, to keep you captive audience, as Brindley gives you a peek into the grimy underbelly of too much money, not enough morals, the sex trade, and espionage. The protagonist, Killian Lebon, is a broken veteran who engages in a very creative form of vigilance. You know it’s wrong, but you can’t help but cheer him on, offer to buy his lunch for his service if you see him in a diner: keeping society safe from people who can’t defend themselves.

My only criticism is that Brindley does paint some of the characters with a broad brush. You have the stereotypical whorish, foul-mouthed black woman (Ruby) whose…

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THE GOOD KILL is now available at BookSirens

Hey, if you’re looking for a hip, as in cool, place to find and review cool, as in hip, books, look no farther than the hip and cool book review site BookSirens

Which of course is even more hip and cool since it is now hosting a book by yours truly.

;)

And if you’re not yet a member but would still like to take the opportunity to download The Good Kill from BookSirens…

Continue reading “THE GOOD KILL is now available at BookSirens”

THE GOOD KILL – A Review by Gina Rae Mitchell

I would like to sincerely thank Ms. Gina Rae Mitchell for taking the time to read The Good Kill and write such a fantastic review for it.

I could tell when first visiting Gina’s website packed full of book reviews, author interviews, and all kinds of other interesting information from gardening tips to tasty recipes that hers was a platform I would love to get my book profiled on. So, as you can imagine, I was very grateful when she responded in the affirmative to my review request.

Continue reading “THE GOOD KILL – A Review by Gina Rae Mitchell”

Huzzah for ManyBooks

You may remember me whining about how my feelings were hurt because ManyBooks and Shelf Awareness never responded to queries I had sent to them over a week-and-a-half ago.

Well, today I’m pleased to report that I received a very kind email from a Ms. Lisa of ManyBooks apologizing to me for not responding to my query in a timely manner and thanking me for bringing the error on their website to their attention.

I truly appreciate that.

Continue reading “Huzzah for ManyBooks”

So, recently I was looking into using the book review services of ManyBooks and Shelf Awareness…

You know, as an alternative to me continually spamming every volunteer book reviewer out there in a mostly fruitless effort to get them to review my book.

However, when I was researching the respective service offerings for ManyBooks and Shelf Awareness, I found I had a couple of questions I needed answering from them before committing.

Continue reading “So, recently I was looking into using the book review services of ManyBooks and Shelf Awareness…”

THE DEVIL ALL THE TIME by Donald Ray Pollock – A Review

BOOK | FICTION | LITERARY
THE DEVIL ALL THE TIME
DONALD RAY POLLOCK
AUDIOBOOK
RATING: ★ ★ ★ ★★

Set in rural southern Ohio and West Virginia, The Devil All the Time follows a cast of compelling and bizarre characters from the end of World War II to the 1960s. There’s Willard Russell, tormented veteran of the carnage in the South Pacific, who can’t save his beautiful wife, Charlotte, from an agonizing death by cancer no matter how much sacrifi­cial blood he pours on his “prayer log.” There’s Carl and Sandy Henderson, a husband-and-wife team of serial kill­ers, who troll America’s highways searching for suitable models to photograph and exterminate. There’s the spider-handling preacher Roy and his crippled virtuoso-guitar-playing sidekick, Theodore, running from the law. And caught in the middle of all this is Arvin Eugene Russell, Willard and Charlotte’s orphaned son, who grows up to be a good but also violent man in his own right.

From the Book Description
Continue reading “THE DEVIL ALL THE TIME by Donald Ray Pollock – A Review”