Fans of Albert Camus are so absurd

Yeah, so call me absurd... Anyway, as happens with my other such favorite influential authors -- Kafka, Vonnegut, Melville, Hemingway, London, Conrad... (I know, I know. This list is very male and very white... I'm working on that. I promise.) -- I, like clockwork, begin jonesin' for a Camus fix at least once a year. … Continue reading Fans of Albert Camus are so absurd

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An Introduction to Author MB Bissett

In my last post “Hey Reader, What’s Your Angle,” I invited you all to share a link to a book that you’ve reviewed that provides some insight, via your writing, as to how you apply your critical thinking strategy towards the books you read.

I’m so happy that MB BLISSETT was kind/brave enough to take me up on the offer; for, not only did he introduce me to THE FEVER by Meg Abbott with his interesting and insightful review of her work, he introduced me to a new eclectic world of creativity and intellect that can be found all throughout his website.

After reading his review that I introduce here, I strongly urge you to then head straight to his About page as it is most interesting and entertaining – I read it and I feel a strong kinship with his outlook toward writing and his literary taste.

Comments are closed here so that you can share your thoughts directly with MB at his website.

MB Blissett

the-fever

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs posits that when base needs are met, then your desires become more refined. Which usually means that your fears probably work on the same level. If you’re not risking death every single time that you give birth, then you’re worried that they will live to be healthy adults and when they’re healthy adolescents, you’re worried about any number of factors. Within the haunted house of parenthood and adolescence, Megan Abbott knows where the ghosts live and shows them to you.

The Fever ably captures the beauty and passion, the terror, the contradictory desire for freedom and privacy, the secrets that women keep from themselves and one another. She uses social media and how it intertwines and defines the worlds of young people subtly and effectively. In the iconography of the modern world, the online video is the sermon, the blowing of the whistle or in this…

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Hey Reader, What’s Your Angle?

Probably the most influential and impactive course I took during my college years (and for me, "college years" do not mean four coming-out-years of raucous partying and occasional studying, it means thirteen long and tedious years of night school, transferring to this college or that college depending on where the military assigned me, and all … Continue reading Hey Reader, What’s Your Angle?

Mark Twain

A Turkey Tale by Mark Twain

#happythanksgivingmyfriends   HUNTING THE DECEITFUL TURKEY Mark Twain When I was a boy my uncle and his big boys hunted with the rifle, the youngest boy Fred and I with a shotgun--a small single-barrelled shotgun which was properly suited to our size and strength; it was not much heavier than a broom. We carried it … Continue reading A Turkey Tale by Mark Twain

Marvel Shmarvel – the real Super Heroes are the Volunteer Readers for #TeamLibriVox

And the Super Hero In Chief at LibriVox is the... Amazing... Spectacular... Sublime... One And Only... Able To Read the Densest Tomes Without Once Tying The Tongue... Mr. Bob Neufeld Seriously folks, if you love classic literature and love to listen to classic voice actors, you need to check out Bob Neufeld's grand body of … Continue reading Marvel Shmarvel – the real Super Heroes are the Volunteer Readers for #TeamLibriVox

My Morning Typical

So, instead of using the time to write like I always wish I had upon realizing that the morning has passed, I usually spend my mornings reading stuff off the web. I start with the news but end up flitting around the data pond like a water bug. A highly caffeinated water bug. So, yeah, … Continue reading My Morning Typical

A Poetic Response to our Occult Relationship with the Vegetable as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The greatest delight which the fields and woods minister, is the suggestion of an occult relation between man and the vegetable. I am not alone and unacknowledged. They nod to me, and I to them. The waving of the boughs in the storm, is new to me and old. It takes me by surprise, and … Continue reading A Poetic Response to our Occult Relationship with the Vegetable as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

A Meditation on an Introduction’s Second Paragraph as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Having moved slow and steady through two readings of Nature, with nightly accompaniments of Librivox audio readings that would lull me away to sleep with visions of all the vast universal wonderments dancing in my head, it is now time to sift through my sporadic notes and swirling thoughts to try to make use of … Continue reading A Meditation on an Introduction’s Second Paragraph as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

theliteraryreader ~ Reviews of the written word

Our good friend in literature and life, Paul Xylinides, author of the powerful and finely crafted novel THE WILD HORSES OF HIROSHIMA, among other works, has taken on the noble challenge of standing up a literary review site that I encourage each of you to visit regularly and enjoy.

The site is called theliteraryreader ~ Reviews of the written word and you can find it at theliteraryreader.com.

So please join me in congratulating Paul on this new adventure of his and thank him for furthering the recognition and advancement of the written word.

Congratulations, Paul, and may you enjoy a success such that we all may be rewarded and enlightened by it.
 

theliteraryreader

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The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor by Kurt Brindley

Review by Paul Xylinides

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Kurt Brindley joins forces with Herman Melville

Before I begin this review, let me first recommend to anyone whom it persuades to read The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor, that after doing so they further benefit themselves by looking again at their copy of Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, Sailor that I shall, however, quote from extensively. Kurt Brindley’s accomplishment should come into even greater focus when looked at through the lens of the nineteenth century classic novel.

Anyone who has ever experienced the injustice of being condemned by those who characterize their sensitivities in ways fundamentally at odds with their true identity will respond deeply to the travails of Kurt Brindley”s protagonist in The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor. From a tellingly different perspective the same fate befalls Melville’s hero. One cannot help but…

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A Word or Two about my First Commitment to my Reading of Emerson

While I had resolved myself to reading Emerson deeply, I had not expected to find myself meditating and reflecting so deeply on individual passages of his writing. I assumed it would be more like me reading an essay and write a summary essay in response. However, what I find is that his writing is so … Continue reading A Word or Two about my First Commitment to my Reading of Emerson

If I Were Queen* of the World… [Thoughtful Thursday Selection]

Uneasy is the head that wears the crown... Leadership is about convincing those whom you lead to do those things that they would not otherwise do. It is about setting an example you wish for others to emulate. It is about making tough choices, choices that oftentimes are not popular, and sometimes even painful...or life … Continue reading If I Were Queen* of the World… [Thoughtful Thursday Selection]

Haiku You, Haiku Me – A Newsletter Love Contest of Sort Selection and Guest Author Presentation

Icy white mountain Snowflakes gust to azure sky- singing flock of doves. As announced in Newsletter Love 004-15, this visually beautiful and flowing haiku is our selection for what came to be known as the inaugural (which suggests there may be more) Newsletter Love Haiku Challenge, formally entitled Haiku You, Haiku Me ~ A Contest … Continue reading Haiku You, Haiku Me – A Newsletter Love Contest of Sort Selection and Guest Author Presentation

A Meditation on an Introduction’s Opening Passage as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Our age is retrospective. It builds the sepulchres of the fathers. It writes biographies, histories, and criticism. The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe? Why should not we have a poetry and philosophy of insight and … Continue reading A Meditation on an Introduction’s Opening Passage as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Biography by Oliver Wendell Holmes

A Meditation on a Title and an Introductory Poem as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

A subtle chain of countless rings The next unto the farthest brings; The eye reads omens where it goes; And speaks all languages of the rose; And, striving to be man, the worm Mounts through all the spires of form   Too often I'll show little regard to introductions and read through them with hardly … Continue reading A Meditation on a Title and an Introductory Poem as found in “Nature” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

I Am Resolved

I am not one who dwells on the past, or, at least I try not to; for, unless one is fondly recalling, perhaps in a prayerful moment of divine gratitude, all the wonders and blessings the Begetter On High has begotten one, it is mostly a futile and potentially harmful self-flagellating exercise of ego worship … Continue reading I Am Resolved