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  • Kurt Brindley 10:15 am on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , experimental fiction, , , horror novels, Mark Z. Danielewski, novels, , supernatural,   

    Any Fans? 

    House of Leaves

     

    Been wanting to read this for a long time but now that I finally have it…

    I find its presence rather… intimidating.
     

    #prayforthetimidreaders

     

     

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    • Katrina 11:50 am on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I read it and enjoyed it. It wasn’t the best book I’ve ever read, but far from the worst.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:34 pm on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Okay. Great. It’s good to know, with all the hoopla around it I’ve seen, it’s not just a love it or hate it kind of read. Thanks for saying so, Katrina.

        Liked by 1 person

    • amariesilver 6:52 pm on March 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      We own it and while I want to read it, I’m also a little intimidated by it. That, and I’ve heard it requires a lot of attention to detail which is hard for me to do with two kids running around.

      Like

  • Kurt Brindley 10:32 am on January 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , cybersecurity, , , , , , novels, , , , ,   

    The Murky Link Between the Russian Cyber Threat and My Novel 

    This is a link to the live recent Senate Intelligence hearing regarding “Russian Hacking and Cybersecurity.”

    This is a murky link.

    This is a link to The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor, my book about the harsh realities of life in the navy during the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell era.

    What is the relevance of the murky link between the two?

    Probably none.

    But you won’t know for sure unless you watch the hearing to understand why the Russian hacking of our cyber space is threat to our sovereignty and read the book to understand why intolerance and bigotry is a threat to our humanity.

    #prettymurkyright

     
    • Alli Farkas 1:45 pm on January 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Oohhh, and now he wants to “restructure” the CIA and DNI–presumably because he and Mr. Flynn think they are “biased”…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 4:20 pm on January 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The DNI, Dubya’s creation, has always been an odd, futile position – budget execution without any operational authority. I’m surprised it’s lasted this long actually. Though, I see #Trump just named his pick for the the post so it’s still up in the air… as most things are with this new reality of ours.

        Like

  • Kurt Brindley 10:50 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , novels, , , ,   

    BELIEVE IN LEAVE 

    So, I was thinking (yes, I understand the risks)…

    But, I was thinking, just imagine if each of the 25,109 and growing followers of this humble site were to donate just $1.00 to help me fund my film LEAVE…

    Just imagine how much that would be!

    Keep in mind that I am a product of the United States public school system, and that, by design, my higher level degrees have absolutely nothing to do with math, so my calculations may be a bit suspect…

    But I believe that if every one of the 25,109 followers were to donate $1.00 to help me fund my film, that would come to the heavenly financial figure of… [finger cipher]…

    $25,109.00!

    Now that there would be a whole lotta of cheeze and it would help me in a whole lotta ways in realizing my cinematic dream called LEAVE.

    Now, I’m a practical man (not!), and I know all 25,109 of you donating $1.00 each to support my dream is an impossible expectation…

    But, let’s consider what you get here for free 24-hours a day, 7-days a week, 365-days a year non-stop and in perpetuity for as long as our pretty yet petulant planet revolves around the sun that may help motivate you towards donating that $1.00…

    You get to publish your work to the RELATING TO HUMANS feature…

    You get the IABS&R…

    You get occasional “PRO-TIPS”…

    You get LITERARY ZEN…

    You get ARTWORK?…

    You get HUMOR…

    You get HEALTH advice…

    You get MOTIVATIONAL ADVICE…

    And you get so much more.

    But, even with all this free stuff created just for you forever floating around here, I understand that my hope of everyone donating even just $1.00 is an impossible expectation.

    But then again…

    SO WAS THE CAVS COMING BACK FROM BEING DOWN 3-1 IN THE FINALS!

    AND SO IS THE TRIBE WINNING THE WORLD SERIES!

    BUT IT’S THE YEAR OF “BELIEVELAND” BABY!

    THIS YEAR, ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE!

    WHICH MEANS, WITH YOUR HELP

    LEAVE IS POSSIBLE!

    Uhm…

    Too much, right?

    Yeah.

    Sorry ’bout that…

    Anyway…

    Please donate what you can, if you can, my friends >> BELIEVE IN LEAVE.

    Thank you.
     

    BELIEVE IN LEAVE

     
     

     
    • joliesattic 12:20 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing that just two years earlier I was in Haiti, totally unaware that there was any tension between our countries. My girlfriend and I wandering alone with two Bulgarians, who didn’t speak English but were willing to share a cab with us as we toured the island.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kurt Brindley 2:40 pm on October 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        When were you there? This happened over several years in the beginning to mid- Nineties. And tension wasn’t between the United States and Haiti, per se. The tension was between the international community, armed with a United Nations resolution, and the military dictators who overthrew the democratically elected government of Haiti.

        Of course, the government they overthrew was also allegedly, and most likely, corrupt and vicious towards much of its population so it was all a little muddy.

        Sadly, Haiti has had a very long streak of bad luck before this trouble that LEAVE is set around and which continues on to this day.

        Liked by 1 person

        • joliesattic 3:34 pm on October 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          I was there in ’78 so I may have misread the date thinking it was that farther back. I know they stalled our trip because of some unrest in one of the areas we were visiting, but I don’t recall where.

          Like

    • Katie Marie 8:59 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Seaman Recruit Kate signing on board.

      That was meant to be a cute way of saying you have my support lol XD

      Like

  • Kurt Brindley 12:28 pm on September 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , George Saunders, , novels, , Redglass Pictures, , , ,   

    George Saunders On Story 

    I haven’t read any Saunders yet; been meaning to…more so after watching this:
     


     


    I discovered this video at Saunders’ site.

    I watched it first at The Atlantic.

    You can see it in its original production at the beautiful site of Redglass Pictures.

    If there are any Saunders fans or nonfans out there, what are your thoughts about his writing. . .

    I wonder.

     
     

     
    • Nic Schuck 3:12 pm on September 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Civil War Land in Bad Decline is so good. As is Braindead Megaphone. Highly recommend George Saunders.

      Liked by 1 person

    • christinenbarba 12:07 am on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I second that ^^^! The Braindead Megaphone is great.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:30 am on October 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesome. I’ll be on the lookout for it. Unfortunately it isn’t available through my Overdrive app, but I am on the list for his newest collection. Thank you, christinenbarba :)

        Like

  • Kurt Brindley 11:13 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , novels, ,   

    Don’t judge my book… 

    Kathy Cecala, an Indie Author and an active and valuable member of our private Facebook group for writers and readers, has some interesting and useful thoughts on the dark art of choosing and creating book covers. I strongly encourage you to check it and all the many other intriguing and compelling writing she has shared for us to read for free on her website.

    KATHYCECALA.COM

    Liked by 1 person

    Kathy Cecala: The Persistent Writer

    Yes, I’m on a writing break, but it doesn’t mean I’m not thinking about the cover for my next. As we all know, you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover. But we all do, it seems.  Supposed experts in publishing tell us the cover is your most important marketing tool, though my own informal survey of readers begs to differ. Some readers will choose a book solely on its cover, but others could care less, using reviews or information on the product page to make their decision.

    Truth be told, I’m in the latter group. Half the time I don’t even look at the cover of a book, even when I’ve finished reading it. And this probably explains why I tend to give short shrift to my own covers as an author. But this time I’m trying to take it seriously, mainly because I don’t feel the…

    View original post 414 more words

     
    • Restless Mind 11:40 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Reading her post, I never realized how discriminatory I am when choosing books based on what’s shown on the cover…oops!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 11:49 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        For all the good and bad of it, it’s in our nature to be discriminating in our tastes, I suppose.

        Like

    • Jay 12:16 pm on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s about time people just accept that we absolutely judge on covers, so make them most of them.

      Like

  • Kurt Brindley 12:41 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , movie adaptations, , novels, , , , , ,   

    The book’s always better than the movie… 

    Right?

    That’s the rule, right?

    Books rule over movies.

    Always.

    Before I got involved with this whole short film thing, I always would get indignant after watching yet another failed movie adaptation of a book I liked. And I would always wonder to myself why in the heck could they never get it write/right.

    Until on a whim I decided to try my hand at adapting my short story LEAVE into a screenplay.

    Right away I realized that this was going to be no easy feat.

    Introspection and contemplation that serve a short story or a novel so well is basically useless in a screenplay where just about everything must be represented as action and dialogue so it can be seen and heard by the audience.

    Of course LEAVE as a short story is mostly introspection and contemplation by the protagonist so right off the bat the whole structure would have to change in order to be able to show his shift of character from beginning to end.

    To do this, new scenes had to be invented and new characters had to be developed and within the first writing of the story of LEAVE as a screenplay, it was already hugely different from the story of LEAVE the short story. And that was only by my own efforts.

    After I showed it to an actor friend for his feedback, from his guidance it went from 33 pages down to fifteen. And yes, to whittle it down that much there had to be a significant change in story and tempo.

    But really, the biggest changes to the story didn’t occur until once the screenplay was accepted by a studio and a director was found and she got ahold of it… and then several of the lead actors got ahold of it…

    Talk about feedback overload. It took much effort and persuasion to maintain it as a story I recognized.

    And, while we are scheduled to begin filming in two months, we haven’t yet cast the lead actor so I can only wonder what changes still might occur to it.

    But you know what… the story as it is now as a near fully developed screenplay is really not that far from what it is as a short story.

    It is just different.

    And much, much better in my opinion.

    Still, I guarantee it if you read the short story and then see the film, you will be significantly surprised by the differences that there are between the two.

    I just hope you are not significantly disappointed.

    But I can pretty much guarantee that you won’t be because we have an awesome crew and the cast is going to be first rate and impressive.

    And I can also guarantee that from now on whenever I watch a movie that has been poorly adapted from a book that I like I will certainly be less critical and more understanding of the differences between the two and the winding and somewhat weary course that had to be traveled to get the story to the screen.

    Because now I know.

    And now I have only one rule regarding movies and books.

    Both of them do.

    Rule, that is…

     


    Have you heard about our private Facebook Writers & Readers Group?

     
     

     
    • juliabarrett 1:05 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting. I love Point of Impact yet also love Shooter (more concise story-telling). I love Nothing Lasts Forever yet also love Die Hard. Remains of the Day is the single example of a book/movie that IMO are equally brilliant.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 2:54 pm on August 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for sharing this. I’ve never seen nor read any of them (except ROTD). Thanks, juliabarrett. :)

        Liked by 1 person

        • juliabarrett 3:11 pm on August 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          I like to read then watch and compare. Sometimes a film is very different but outstanding regardless.

          Like

    • simplydelete 1:12 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You made some great points! While I usually like the book better than the movie, a lot of time the movie is good enough that if I hadn’t read the book I’d probably really enjoy it. This also helps explain why one of my favorite childhood books “Ella Enchanted” was totally changed and, in my opinion, was a terrible movie. If they did it word for word from the book it probably would’ve made a slow, boring movie. The main plot was the same, but everything else about it was different. I guess it’s hard when you have a book you love completely changed into something you never imagined it would be.

      Liked by 2 people

    • joliesattic 3:41 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations on your film!! That is awesome. Looking forward to it.1

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jay 4:32 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s hard when you read a book first and love it. Books are hard to convert 100% so even very good adaptations feel like they’re missing something to the readers that love it. I have seen some great movies that are adapted though, so it’s doable. But yes, they’re different animals. And that’s okay.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dalindcy 5:42 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting perspective! I try not to compare books and movies too much. They are such different mediums and both have their pro’s and cons.

      Like

    • Thomas Weaver 6:42 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sure, the book is always better than the movie…

      Except The Princess Bride…
      And The Hunger Games…
      And The Cloud Atlas…
      And several others…

      I don’t understand why some people feel they have to “prove” written fiction is inherently superior to screen fiction. They both have advantages and disadvantages: a novel can have as big a “special-effects budget” as the author wants, but most novels, unlike movies and television, don’t have a soundtrack with interesting music. (A couple of my favorite novels DO have “soundtracks,” or at least music recommended by the authors, but that may be because the authors are also musicians and so think about such things more.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 2:51 pm on August 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, for me, I invest much more time in a book and, consequently, become very attached to those that move me. So, when a movie adaptation of a book that I’m attached to, in my estimation, fails, then I usually have the need to express my disappointment… not sure if I’m looking to prove anything. It just seems to me that more often than not a book is better than a movie adaptation of it. As far as a comparison between the two mediums in general, that’s a different discussion.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thomas Weaver 3:13 pm on August 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          “More often than not” isn’t the same thing as “always.” Yes, the book IS usually better. Sometimes it isn’t.

          Like

    • andysmerdon 2:36 am on August 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good luck with it mate – I’ll look forward to the adaption :)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mellow Curmudgeon 11:18 am on August 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The movie *A Beautiful Mind* was based on Sylvia Nasar’s biography of the schizophrenic mathematician John Nash. The movie had the same title as the book but zillions of differences. Somebody asked Nasar whether the movie was a faithful adaptation; she replied that it was “true to the architecture of Nash’s life”. Yes. Trying for detailed accuracy in the timeline and trying to explain the Nash Equilibrium Theorem correctly would have made a deadly dull movie. While some of the distortions and simplifications can be questioned, the overall result was a good movie that encouraged people to look into the book and/or what the theorem really says.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 2:43 pm on August 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        This is a fantastic example, MC. Watched the movie with the fam, loved it, and one of my kids read the book and reported back that, while a good book, it was much different than the movie.

        Liked by 1 person

    • TANYA LARA 1:39 pm on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Not always. :) I can name a few absolutely fantastic movies that are better than the books they were adapted from: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (book by John Berendt), Sideways (book by Rex Pickett), and Fight Club (book by Chuck Palahniuk).

      Like

    • theherdlesswitch 2:35 pm on August 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for pointing this very important fact, it’s hard to translate a book to screen. Not saying I won’t be disappointed with an adaptation, but I do always take this into consideration : )

      Meno

      Like

    • iwritedumbshit 5:17 pm on August 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Like every rule, this one has its exceptions. The Shawshank Redemption starring Tim Robbins and Morgran Freeman was based on a novella by Stephen King titled Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. I have no qualms with stating that the movie was superior.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Farid Solana 3:15 pm on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It is not easy to visualize the product of our imagination, and most end with poor quality. What happens to Nicholas Nickleby is one of the most vivid examples to me. Hope yours is better, Kurt.

      Like

    • The Vibrant dame 7:08 am on September 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Wow!! And all the very best😃😃

      Liked by 1 person

    • Restless Mind 2:59 pm on September 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Books aren’t necessarily better than films, I just have to be aware that the film is the producer’s interpretation of the book. I feel I need to be open-minded and give credit to the producers for doing their best (at least I hope so) to incorporate all possible angles while following the storyline, without twisting author’s writing too much.

      Some films make me cringe because they destroy my own personal imagination and interpretation of the book to the point in which I can’t re-read the book without my contaminated imagination ruining it. But if I were to view the films by itself prior to reading the book first, I’d applaud it.

      I think the only time BOTH the book and the film killed it for me was the Twilight series (Yes, I read them…and saw them…I don’t like to talk about it..)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 11:45 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well said, RM. And don’t worry I won’t judge, especially since I’ve read nor seen neither of the Twilight series. :)

        Liked by 1 person

  • Kurt Brindley 10:44 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , novels, , , , ,   

    Write Edit Write: A Private Facebook Group for Writers and Readers 

    WRITE EDIT WRITE SUPPORTER LOGO
     
    So, I’m creating a private Facebook group for writers and readers who are interested in the discussion of all things related to the process and business of writing.

    This will be somewhat an extension of what I do with the Newsletter Love subscribers, but on a much more intimate and informal level. The newsletter process is a bit too formal and segmented and involving to really achieve what I would like to achieve, which is: to network, make connections, and improve our abilities and chances for success as writers.

    As much as I hate to admit it, Facebook provides a much better environment to achieve this objective.

    Like we’ve done with the newsletter, we can do poetry and flash fiction challenges there as well, with the goal of getting the best of the group’s writing onto my blog and out via the newsletter (is there irony to be found there?)

    I am willing to moderate this members only group, provided the members are willing to receive free copies of all my published work and are willing to consider writing reviews for them. In addition to my present work, I would provide all future work for free to these members and ask for them to be both beta readers and to post early reviews of the work once published to help with future sales.

    As some of you may know, I am producing a short film called LEAVE that is based upon a screenplay adapted from my short story of the same name. I will provide first and sometimes exclusive insight to the movie making process to this group as I learn it. I will also post photos and videos there that I’ll take when on set. We currently are scheduled to shoot the film in LA in mid-October of this year. If you become of member of this group, you will hear any news about the film first.

    Who knows how this group will evolve but the early members will be the ones who help me build the foundation for its future.

    Some current projects I’m working on that I hope to finish soon with the group’s help are:

    • a short story collection, which includes the short story LEAVE.
    • part two of Hercules Gone Mad (I’ve been hoping to finish the story collection and part two for a long time now, which is why I will look to this group to help motivate me to bring them to completion)
    • a feature film length script for LEAVE (we already have distributors interested in the movie but they need to see a completed full-length script first)

    But the group wouldn’t be just about me. My hope is that all within the group could forge relationships where each could seek similar help from others for her or his own writing efforts.

    So, there is a lot we can discuss and accomplish there. If you are interested, you can either let me know publicly in the comment section and I will email you the link; or, you can email me through the contact page and I will reply to you with the link.

    I used to call this blog WRITE EDIT WRITE a while back so that’s what I will call the group for now. We’ll see how things evolve and change its name if needed. Let me know when you’re a member if you have a better name. :)

    But I can’t create the group until I have at least one member so please let me know if you’re in.

    Right on?

    Oh yeah… let’s do this, my friends.

    Write on!


    NOTE: When requesting an invite, please include the email address your facebook account is associated with either in a comment request or via a request through the contact page.


     
     

     
    • frenchc1955 2:32 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      yes, I am interested.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 2:40 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesome! With your support I can now create the page and I will send you an invite via its automated form. Thanks so much, frenchc1955 – I’ll see you soon inside our new forum!

        Like

    • kkbrew 2:45 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m in for the FB group.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mkvecchitto 3:01 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d love to join.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kurt Brindley 3:06 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you very much, mkvecchitto! Your invite has been sent and I look forward to seeing you on the inside! :)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:13 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi there. I see you haven’t accepted the invite yet. I wonder if it’s because you use a different email address for facebook. If so, and if you’re still interested in joining the group, please let me know the email address either here or via an email to me through the contact page and I’ll send out a new invite to it. Thanks, mkvecchitto!

        Liked by 1 person

    • leebalanarts 4:47 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      OK – I want to join the Facebook group. Sounds mighty interesting and useful. thanks

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth Anne Mitchell 6:08 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to be included in the group.

      Liked by 1 person

    • joliesattic 6:35 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I would give it a go.

      Liked by 1 person

    • hotmessmemoir 9:41 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I am interested. Trying to figure out the best route for the 2 books I’ve created.

      Liked by 1 person

    • kathycecala 9:53 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This sounds like the kind of group I’ve been looking for! Would definitely be interested in joining

      Liked by 1 person

    • shalini 10:23 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hi! I am interested ! And all the best for your endeavours!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mjennings 11:36 pm on July 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m in! What do I need to do?

      Liked by 1 person

    • coty3 1:33 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds interesting. I would also like to be a part of it. I am M. Coty Myers on facebook.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:46 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesome. I just sent an invite to your email address via facebook. Thanks for the interest and I’ll see you on the inside!

        Like

      • Kurt Brindley 12:16 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi there. I see you haven’t accepted the invite yet. I wonder if it’s because you use a different email address for facebook. If so, and if you’re still interested in joining the group, please let me know the email address either here or via an email to me through the contact page and I’ll send out a new invite to it. Thanks, coty3!

        Like

    • Jen 2:54 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great idea! I’d like to join!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:48 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesomeness! I just sent the invite. I’ll see you on the inside :)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:17 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi there. I see you haven’t accepted the invite yet. I wonder if it’s because you use a different email address for facebook. If so, and if you’re still interested in joining the group, please let me know the email address either here or via an email to me through the contact page and I’ll send out a new invite to it. Thanks, Jen!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Katie Marie 4:23 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds like a great idea.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:49 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’m happy you think so, Katie. I’m encouraged by the response. Would you like to join?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Katie Marie 8:14 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          Yes, I would thank you :)

          Like

          • Kurt Brindley 10:28 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

            That’s great, Katie! Thanks so much for your interest. I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. When you have the chance, please introduce yourself to the group. I’ll see you on the inside!

            Like

    • sam1128 4:33 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Be interested in joining. Sam

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:53 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        That’s great, Sam! Thanks so much for your interest. I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. I’ll see you on the inside!

        Like

      • Kurt Brindley 12:19 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi there. I see you haven’t accepted the invite yet. I wonder if it’s because you use a different email address for facebook. If so, and if you’re still interested in joining the group, please let me know the email address either here or via an email to me through the contact page and I’ll send out a new invite to it. Thanks, sam1128!

        Liked by 1 person

    • robynelliot 8:16 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Kurt, love this! I just have some questions for you: can I join? can I join? can I join? can I join? Also re LEAVE, have you asked the descendants of de Mille about your close-up yet?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:56 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        The pleasure and honor is all mine. A fb invite has been sent to your email address, my friend. As for the de Mille’s… they haven’t yet returned my call. :)

        Liked by 1 person

    • Katrina 10:05 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Yes! I’m definitely interested.

      Like

      • Kurt Brindley 10:59 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesomeness! I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. I’ll see you on the inside! Thanks, Katrina.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Obimbo Nereah 11:18 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hey Kurt…. got room for one more? I’m definitely interested in the FB group. #FingersCrossed :)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:25 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesomeness! I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. I’ll see you on the inside! Thanks, Obimbo!

        Like

    • janjoy52 5:35 pm on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I love your enthusiasm and vision! I think you are a genius and have a brilliant plan that will boost so many other enthusuastic writers. Wish I could be one but this is not my season to venture there. Nevertheless I wish you and those who join your efforts tremendous success!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Massenzio 8:10 am on August 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Kurt, Sounds wonderful. Please count me in.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 9:39 am on August 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        That’s fantastic, Don. We’ll be honored to have you. I sent the FB invite to the email address associated with this comment. Please let me know if it should go to a different address. We’re just getting things in place now and folks are introducing themselves. See you there!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Massenzio 8:11 am on August 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Don Massenzio's Blog.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tamye Whitener 11:38 am on August 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Books, Coffee, and Crafts News.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tamye Whitener 11:40 am on August 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Please add me to the group. I’m Tamye Davis Whitener on Facebook.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Heather Cai 3:31 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Dear Kurt, could you please count me in? I’m Heather Cai on Facebook. I also wonder if anyone likes to read my first English novel here.

      Like

      • Kurt Brindley 10:30 am on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, Heather! Thanks so much for your interest. I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. When you have the chance, please introduce yourself to the group. I’ll see you on the inside!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Heather Cai 10:44 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

          Hi Kurt, thanks for the invitation! I’ve got two same emails from you. I tried to join the group, but it says: Cant accept invite – you must be an invitee… I don’t know what’s wrong. Do you?

          Like

          • Kurt Brindley 11:32 am on August 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

            Hi, Heather. I sent the invite to the email address you have associated with wordpress/this comment. If your facebook is associated with a different email address, please let me know what it is either here or emailing it to me via the contact page. Thanks.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Katrina 12:06 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Calliope Writing and commented:
      Fellow writer and blogger Kurt Brindley has set up a private Facebook group for all things writing! If you’re interested, either visit his post and request an invite, or let me know you want in and I’ll get an invite sent.

      Write on!

      Liked by 1 person

    • David B. Seaburn 12:56 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hey Katrina: Sounds great. Help me get on board.
      dave

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 9:55 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, David! Thanks so much for your interest. I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. When you have the chance, please introduce yourself to the group. I’ll see you on the inside!

        Like

    • pamelascanepa 6:22 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d love to join!

      Like

      • Kurt Brindley 10:03 pm on August 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hey, Pamela! So cool that you’re interested in joining the group. I’ve just sent a fb invite to your email address associated with this comment. If there is a different address I should use, please let me know here or via the Contact page. When you have the chance, please introduce yourself to the group. I’ll see you on the inside, my friend!

        Liked by 1 person

    • theherdlesswitch 2:53 pm on August 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ll keep this in mind when I finally get around to opening a facebook account ; )
      It’s wonderful for us writers to be able to support each other and network!

      Meno

      PS. Thanks for following!

      Liked by 1 person

    • artrosch 8:55 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Send me an invite, Kurt. I’m isolated from fellow artists and really need a community. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:21 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesome. I just sent an invite to the email address associated with this comment. If your facebook account is associated with a different email address, please let me know what it is either here or by sending me an email through my contact page and I’ll send a new invite to that address. Look forward to seeing you on the inside. When there, please introduce yourself to the group when you have the chance and the desire. There are a few different things going on, one of them is our first writing challenge. :)

        Like

    • Helen 5:45 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hi I am interested 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 10:18 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, Helen! I’m so happy you’re interested in joining the group. I just sent an invite to the email address associated with this comment. If your facebook account is associated with a different email address, please let me know what it is either here or by sending me an email through my contact page and I’ll send a new invite to that address.

        Also, once inside, please scroll through all the various discussions to get a feel with what’s going on – we just kicked off our first writing challenge – and then introduce yourself to the group at your earliest convenience and desire and let us know your relationship to writing and reading and anything else you’re willing to share. :)

        Like

    • Mel A Rowe 10:23 pm on August 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      HI, I’m interested in joining your FB group. Please? :)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:13 am on August 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, Mel. That’s great. I will send an invite to the group to the email address associated with this comment. If this is not the same email address associated with your facebook account, please let me know what it is by either replying to this comment or by sending it to me via my contact page and I’ll send out a new invite to it. Once you’re in, please familiarize yourself with some of the stream and introduce yourself to the group. Thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Katie's Time Travelling Kitchen 4:05 pm on August 12, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hi! I’d love to join this please! :)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 3:28 pm on August 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Awesome, KTTK! I just sent an invite to the email address associated with your comment. If your facebook is associated with a different address please let me know here or by emailing me via my contact page. Once inside, please get yourself familiar and introduce yourself to the group! :)

        Liked by 1 person

  • Kurt Brindley 12:34 pm on May 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , novels, , , , , , ,   

    Writer’s Block Is Only In Your Mind… 

    And That’s The Problem.
     


     

    #amwriting
    #not

     
     

     
  • Kurt Brindley 1:33 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , novels, , , , Sherrie Cronin,   

    INSPIRATION IN THE WORST OF PLACES | A Guest Post by Author Sherrie Cronin 

    With pleasure and gratitude, it is my honor to share with you a Guest Post by Author Sherrie Cronin. As April is Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, Sherrie’s post, and her books, are timely, important, and educational, as, sadly, the exploitation and abuse of women only seems to be worsening. Obviously, we must do more to prevent this; for this is not a problem only found in countries far and distinct from our own, it is a problem that just may be found not too far from our very own doorstep. On the sidebar, you will find her novel c3 and a link to where you can learn more about Sherrie and her books. I strongly encourage you to support Sherrie and her efforts.


     

    INSPIRATION IN THE WORST OF PLACES
    by Sherrie Cronin

    46ascending.org

     

    When I first outlined the stories for 46. Ascending, I knew that c3 would be about a group of young women who would thwart a sex trafficking ring, because I wanted a venue to explore the extreme edges of the way we as a society pretend not to see the many ways in which young women are exploited. I fully expected that my research would take me to some horrifying places, and it did. An internet connection is all one needs to visit ping pong shows in Bangkok and to peruse ads for “sexy and willing” Russian women. I still get the ads — I need to wash out my browser with soap.

    What I did not expect, however, were how many inspirational stories and websites I would encounter as well. I stared my research with Somaly Mam’s book The Road of Lost Innocence: The True Story of a Cambodian Heroine and I highly recommend it.

    My browsing then took me to the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, a group of Catholic Nun’s who have spent the last couple of centuries reaching out to women in unfortunate circumstances. I liked what I read so much that an imaginary nun worked herself into my story even though she wasn’t even in the outline. I hope that members of the order would not be offended by my spunky Sister Teresa-Marie, as she turned out to be one of my favorite characters in the book. Please read about this fine group and their efforts to help victims of human trafficking at goodshepherdsisters.org/trafficking.htm.

    Next I found several non-profit organizations dedicated to stopping human trafficking, each one with an inspiring story. I will likely blog about them all individually here over time. One of the first that I encountered was an organization called Shared Hope International, founded by U.S. Congresswoman Linda Smith after she traveled into the heart of the brothel district in Mumbai, India where “she witnessed the brutal exploitation and sexual slavery of women and children.” She has been trying to do something about it ever since. This group also has a Facebook page well worth visiting and liking.

    I expected to be disgusted at some of what I found, and I was. I expected to believe that this was a problem with no solution. Instead, I found brave women and men of all nations, ages, and belief systems working for positive change. I did not expect to walk away from my research marveling at those who fight every day to shine a bright light into the darkest of corners. But I did, and I am marveling at them still.


    To find out how you, too, can promote your book or project, please visit here.

     
     

     
    • M. L. Kappa 2:21 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well done. It takes guts to tackle subjects like this one. We get so much horrible news already, it’s so tempting to avoid them…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sherrie Cronin 3:00 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks M.L. I struggled with not sugar-coating the topic and yet not writing a book so painful that no one would want to read it. It was a challenge. I appreciate your encouragement!

        Liked by 3 people

    • Bookwraiths 5:28 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It is so difficult to believe that human trafficking and this type of exploitation of fellow human beings still take place in this modern age. Good to know there are people tackling this issue head on, and writers willing to delve into the topic and bring it to everyone’s attention.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sherrie Cronin 7:23 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks Bookwraiths. According to the many sources I used, and to the social worker I consulted who has some knowledge of this field, this remains a real problem today. What is new is the technological resources available both to the perpetrators and those trying to stop them.

        Liked by 2 people

    • nvsubbaraman 7:15 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice and enjoyable post. Thanks . Congrats.

      Liked by 2 people

    • oldpoet56 10:20 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      • Sherrie Cronin 1:13 pm on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Old Poet 56: while I initially appreciated your publicity for my book, this morning I spent some time on your blog and am compelled to tell you that I am offended by the harsh Islamophobia that I found on your website. I am approximately your age and have worked with a large variety of cultures as I spent 32 years as a geophysicist in the oil business. I have found many good, kind people among every nation, creed, age group and other demographic I encountered and I believe you do humanity a huge disservice by painting any one group with a single brush. I think it would be best if you removed any reference to my book from your site. If you read it, you would find that it treats all cultures found in Central Asia with appreciation and respect and that it presents a theme of peace well at odds with the tone of your blog.

        Like

    • krushnakulkarni 9:49 am on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good subject and you are very nicely carved your thoughts in it. I really like your blog.
      keep writing. Thanks for sharing with us.

      Liked by 2 people

  • Kurt Brindley 10:12 am on April 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , novels, , , , , ,   

    So, I’m Going To Make A Movie… UPDATE #3 

    We Have Our Captain!

    I am pleased and honored to announce that we have found/been blessedly bestowed with a Director for our film LEAVE.

    With a captain now at our film’s helm (yes, I do love my sailing metaphors), we will soon be launching our Indiegogo funding campaign, where we will happily and proudly announce all Cast & Crew.

    Even once the Indiegogo campaign launches, we will continue to run our website funding campaign here for those Indie Authors and other Indie Creator-types who would rather receive one of the Reward Packages as a donation incentive to promote their books or other projects versus the incentives that will be offered with the Indiegogo campaign.

    To be notified when the Indiegogo campaign goes live, please sign up here.

    To learn more about the website funding campaign and how you can promote your books or other projects, please visit here.

    To go ahead and just donate now, please do so here.

    After you donate via the website campaign, you should be automatically directed to a page where you can select your Reward Package. If you are not directed to the page, please let me know and I will personally assist you.

    Right on?

    Write on!


    PLEASE SUPPORT ALL THOSE WHO SUPPORT OUR FILM.

    YOU MAY BE ALSO INTERESTED IN:

    So I’m going to make a movie…
    So I’m going to make a movie… UPDATE #1
    So I’m going to make a movie… UPDATE #2

     
     

     
  • Kurt Brindley 12:00 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bob Neufeld, , , Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad, LibriVox, , , novels, , , voice actors,   

    Marvel Shmarvel – the real Super Heroes are the Volunteer Readers for #TeamLibriVox 

    And the Super Hero In Chief at LibriVox is the…

    Amazing…
    Spectacular…
    Sublime…
    One And Only…
    Able To Read the Densest Tomes Without Once Tying The Tongue…

    Mr. Bob Neufeld

    Seriously folks, if you love classic literature and love to listen to classic voice actors, you need to check out Bob Neufeld’s grand body of work.

    Seriously folks, I’ve been a fan of Neufeld’s ever since I found him at the beginning of my First Commitment to Emerson (yes, that’s still a thing – stay tuned).

    Seriously folks, I just finished Neufeld’s reading of a Heart of Darkness and I’ve never experienced the book so deeply and movingly. More to follow on this reading.

    Seriously folks, go to his page, load up your Kindle with all books Neufeld has narrated, and spend your summer, like intend to, listening to the greatest literature being read by one great voice actor.

    And you can do it all for free.

    You’re welcome, folks.

    Seriously…

     
     

     
    • Russell J. Fellows 12:07 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      There are a lot of great volunteers over at LibriVox. I’ve enjoyed listening.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:12 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Yeah man… I see that they allow us readers to send thank you notes to the volunteers. Gonna have to send something to Neufeld.

        Liked by 1 person

    • kenyonarcopeland01 12:18 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on KENYONA R. COPELAND.

      Like

    • Ava 12:22 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Like, seriously?

      Liked by 1 person

    • l1brarygrl 6:41 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Huge reader, know there are wonderful audio book actors? readers? I’ve tried and can’t stay focused. I need that book in my hands.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 9:12 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, I prefer the hard copy as well for the deep read; but I find the voice reading is a nice accompaniment and brings a different perspective to the work.

        Liked by 1 person

        • l1brarygrl 10:55 pm on June 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

          Then I want to see it acted out ;) I often read books aloud. Kinda ironic, I think. Esp. with English characters. I read an entire book aloud in a British (it got better!) accent recently. And my therapist wonders why a good man hasn’t snatched me up yet…lol

          Like

  • Kurt Brindley 12:25 pm on June 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , novels, , , productivity, ,   

    Summertime Blues – A Call for Guest Contributors 

    I read an article a good while back about a study that concluded that we humans tend to be more productive and creative during cooler weather periods than warmer weather periods. Now, I cannot speak to the veracity of the study; however, I can speak to the fact that from now (and maybe even sooner) until the end of summer, if not longer, yours truly will be significantly less productive and creative.

    Consequently, in an effort to, if not cure, than at least offset my summertime productive blues, I ask for your assistance. I am asking all you Indie-types, be you an author, artist, photographer, whatever, to contribute a guest post to this blog discussing what it has been like for you to self-publish your work.

    You are free to discuss your creative process, the logistical process, the publishing process, or whatever process you have gained insight to during your Indie experience that you feel will both interest and instruct us, and, ultimately, improve and enhance our own future Indie efforts.

    Oh, and while you are at it, don’t forget to pitch to us the final product of your creative effort (book, artwork, photography, etc.) for which you wish us to purchase.

    You can email me your submission through the Contact page and we’ll work together from there to get it posted.

    The more submissions, the merrier. I expect it to be a long, hot unproductive summer for me so I hope you all are willing to help me to keep this blog active and interesting throughout.

    Please include links to any pictures or products you’d like to include in your post and I’ll format them to your liking.

    Our first guest author post in this series is by author Jason Greensides and it will be up tomorrow evening, Inshallah. In the interim, you can check out Jason’s work at jasongreensides.com.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    And let the long lazy hazy unproductive days of summer begin!

    Right on?

    Write on!

     
    • Rajat 3:33 am on May 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      great thing to do…..

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rajiv 6:12 am on May 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Lemme see if I can come up with something

      Liked by 1 person

    • foxress 1:49 pm on May 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I love this idea Thanks Kurt!

      Liked by 1 person

    • davecenker 11:36 am on June 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      So, if I am living in Florida, I suppose I am doomed for nine months out of the year, huh? ;-) As a native Pennsylvanian, I do miss the cooler weather, especially in the fall. Ironically, I have just taken the leap, maybe prematurely, into the world of digital self-publishing through the Amazon Kindle program. This is a great idea to help everyone keep moving forward until those cool breezes of inspiration return – I’m looking forward to it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 1:36 pm on June 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Hey, good luck, fellow Indie Author and homeboy. Write up a post about your work an submit it. I’d love to learn and share. Thank you for the very kind comment, dc.

        Like

    • thia licona 10:24 pm on July 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I am honored with your following! I have not checked my sites for new followers until a few moments ago and, I found you! Wow! My Father has a marvelous way of getting His point across yours truly thick brains!
      Here I was, wandering about because of love, (lack or existence of it) emotions, passions, human beings and me!
      In dealing with the amazing and successful best sellers freely givers of their talents to us rookies, I have come to a very unique stage of my journey in the Presence of my Father.
      Thus, my wandering. But, on this moment of my wandering, up pops none other but the most unique of the unique in this world of publishers, none other than Kurt Brindley! And he is following me? Wow!
      Yours truly is at a stand still moment in this posting matter, but, I would like to submit my entry about this matter in the journal of my life. Perhaps you will find it worthy of some attention. I will email you in a moment.
      Again, you are the most unique of the unique in this world–just like I like to describe my own self! Ha! Ha! HalleluYah! :-)
      His love in my heart for all, thia/Basilia

      Liked by 1 person

  • Kurt Brindley 7:28 am on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Jason Greensides, , , novels, , , ,   

    A Guest Post by Author Jason Greensides 

    Mysterious Characters and Unforgivable Acts of Violence
    by Jason Greensides
     

    One piece of writing advice that never set well with me – however useful it is at a practical level – is to know your characters: that you should be able to understand every little aspect of your character if you ever want them to be believable, sympathetic, and to leap off the page. Of course, in general this is useful advice, however, not only has this the potential to make writing less fun (one of the reasons I write is to discover something I didn’t know), but seems a fundamental flaw in how we should perceive other people in everyday life, particularly the violent and anti-social ones. It presupposes that characters and real people can be fully understood (and therefore judged), which I believe to be not only impossible, but ethically wrong.

    The Baltimore Riots and other events of social upheaval always produce the same reaction in me. Not: How could those people act that like that? But: How could those reporting on events (which, because of ‘likes’, shares and unseen algorithms, is actually you and I), cast absolutist judgement upon people whose circumstances we can’t fully comprehend, as they themselves can’t. This too is another reason why I hate that writing mantra Know your characters: How can I truly know my characters when I don’t understand all the things that make me me?

    Not only do the episodes of one’s own life seen through the lens of chance obfuscate analysis of what motivates us – our childhood, our parent’s lives, our grandparent’s lives, and back through human history – but at a genetic level, when you analyse how genes move from generation to generation through natural selection. It is the interplay between their outward characteristics and the environment in which they find themselves, not foresight or inherent strength, that ensures their survival through time. Once you know this, you can’t help but come to the conclusion that really genes just make this shit up as they go along.

    Then there are random geological and cosmic events that shape the course of the planet and life as a whole – an endless swirling and shifting series of events with (possibly) no primary cause, adding yet more uncertainly about what made us who we are.

    And at the atomic level, Heisenberg stated that you can’t know the position and momentum of a particle to 100% accuracy. So if you can’t know that then how can you know everything about someone’s deeper motivations, which in turn are obscured by their own life’s events, and in turn their understanding of those same events.

    Life is brimming with chance and the ever unknowable – it’s everything but perfect and absolute – and this is what we (as artists, as writers) must embrace if our work, however down-to-Earth, is to reflect the great mystery of existence.

    The hard thing about this is, of course, when writing so called ‘evil’ characters (and if you’re still with me you’ll agree this is a useless term), or seeing ‘evil’ acts play out in society, trying to suspend judgement upon them is one of the hardest things we can do. If a group of guys broke into my house, for example, and assaulted me and my wife, I too would call them evil, would want absolute judgement to squeeze the breath from their throats. I too would not be able to forgive.

    But we must try, because ultimately, however you think about it, there had to have been at least one Nazi who, while placing the cold barrel of his Luger to the back of the head of a Polish Jew, thought, ‘Seriously, what the hell am I doing?; there must have been one Cheka officer who, while denying a Kulak his daily allowance of bread, thought, ‘My wife is really not going to like this’; there must have been one RPKAD commando in Indonesia who, before raping the fifteen-year-old daughter of a suspected Communist, thought, ‘What if my own daughter found out?’ Then moral complexity is further muddled when we do not consider pilots of Allied forces carrying out the bombing of Dresden as monsters, do not view leaders of the Western world as having committed an atrocity when imposing economic sanctions on Iraq.

    So, suspend your judgement in everyday life, if you can (and I, for my part, will try to suspend my judgement upon those who deal with sweeping, all-inclusive statements of evil), and maybe, just maybe, the characters you create may have a little mystery, may have a little of the unknown, may be dynamic enough to hold our attention until the last page.


    Jason Greensides

    Jason Greensides


     
    The Distant Sound of Violence

    A contemporary novel by Jason Greensides

    WEBSITE: JasonGreensides.com
    TWITTER: @jasongreensides
    FACEBOOK: facebook.com/jasongreensidesauthor
    GOODREADS: goodreads.com/Jason_greensides

     
     

     
    • Aimer Boyz 11:06 pm on May 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for your literate, logical defense of NOT knowing your character’s every quirk and dimple before you start writing. I not only find that impossible but unnatural. A stranger becomes a friend over time, through shared conversations and experiences. So too, my characters evolve over time through scenes and dialogue. To me, NOT knowing your characters but, rather, learning to know your characters as you write seems more authentic.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Robert Mitchell 5:23 am on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      A brave statement — not only on the subject of knowing one’s characters but with regard to the nature of evil. I would add that the best fictional villains, like their real life counterparts, are trying to do what they think is right and struggling with their internal demons. Vlad the Impaler is a hero in his homeland, and Columbus a villain to the native cultures he destroyed.

      Liked by 2 people

    • jasongreensides 6:01 am on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I completely agree, Aimer. Discovering and getting to know my characters as I go along is where all the fun is!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jason Greensides 6:15 am on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, Robert Mitchell, the waters of moral judgement are murky indeed

      Liked by 1 person

    • jasongreensides 8:03 am on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on jasongreensides.

      Like

    • PaulXylinides, May the mermaids sing to you ... 2:46 pm on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      It seems to me that there is a difference between understanding a character’s state of being and capturing one’s sense of it – isn’t that where the interest lies as the act reflects as much upon oneself? Quite right, when one meets someone and detects their good mood, there is no need to wonder if it is due to a perfect latte that morning.

      Liked by 1 person

    • PaulXylinides, May the mermaids sing to you ... 3:06 pm on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      One added thought – a certain type of information would, however, seem essential for the true presentation of a character. If a so-called evil actor’s motivation comes from a particular world view that justifies the act, it would be incumbent to unearth and provide this within the depiction especially if one is fictionalizing historical persons.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jasongreensides 6:06 pm on May 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, Paul, that space between a character’s state of being and our sense of it (and how the writer chooses to convey it) is where our work lies – agreed. And yes, of course there’s going to be essential information about a character which must be given to the reader… I just think that if you compiled all the facts of a persons life, for example, put every event in a Excell spreadsheet, you still couldn’t fully make sense of it, there would still be that 1% margin of error…

      Like

    • Angel 4 Light 1:31 am on May 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Angel 4 Light.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Kurt Brindley 7:05 am on April 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: author, cartoonists, , , , , , J Hardy Carroll, , novels, , , ,   

    A Guest Post by Author J Hardy Carroll 

    It is my pleasure, privilege, and honor to present to you a whirlwind of wisdom and intrigue from the author of HAWSER, our IABS&R Volume 3 selection.


    Or So You Say
    by J Hardy Carroll

    Tell me the truth, now.

    You always dreamed of being a writer. Doesn’t matter whether your dream took the shape of Erica Jong in a penthouse sipping Moet while talking into a Dictaphone or Hemingway slouched over a café crème wearing down a stub pencil in a composition notebook.

    Your dream isn’t of fame, of wealth or even of the admiration of your fellows.

    No. Your dream is much simpler.

    Your dream is to be paid for your unadulterated idea.

    It is a strong dream, a storyteller’s dream, but it is a dream fraught with questions.

    Who are you to tell a story?

    What makes your idea worth anyone’s time?

    How in God’s name can you call yourself a writer?

    You know the facts. Writing badly is easy. It just comes. You’re so pleased with it. You are proud. Until you forget.

    You forget that writing well is ridiculously hard, a series of tasks, many unrewarding and some downright unpleasant. Self-delusion lurks in every dark corner and all your worst tendencies get laid out naked on the slab in public view. Your clever clichés and trite situations and penchant to lecture form a kind of cesspool though which you wade, dragging for a story as though it was the body of a murder victim.

    J Hardy Carroll, Writer, Poet, & Cartoonist

    My, how you do go on.

    But tell me the truth.

    Secretly, you think you’re great. Admit it.

    Well, maybe not great. Not yet. But good. Good enough to get published, anyway. Except for the fact that there aren’t any publishers these days willing to take a chance on somebody without an MFA from Iowa or Emerson or Columbia.

    Or maybe it’s this: maybe you’re not so great. Maybe you are only great at lying to yourself.

    So start another story. Maybe this time it will turn out better. Maybe this one will actually be something you can open in six months and read with a degree of pleasure or even pride.

    Did you read that piece on Andre Dubus, about how he would take a year to write a single story, how he would trim 150 pages down to twenty, how one perfect sentence followed another?

    Did you read about how Jack London pawned his bicycle for postage to send out his manuscripts only to have them come back months later with form rejection notices tucked inside the self-addressed stamped envelope?

    Did you read about Annie Proulx writing cookbooks?

    By the way, who in hell do you think you are?

    You didn’t finish college. Your father was a professor who taught Chaucer and Beowulf and who never wrote anything down. You dedicated your first novel to him but he died before he got a chance to read it. In his life he finished only one short story, the one about his father called My Father’s Dreams that you read when you were in high school, the one that made you cry and wonder why your dad didn’t write more.

    Or at all. Your dad could talk an acorn into an oak, but he never could finish anything. How many stories did he start and never finish?

    Is this about him? Is that all there is to the dream? No? What, then?

    Don’t give me that shit about how when you first read Faulkner, hacked your way though the twisted vines of his prose only to find yourself lost in a thicket, befuddled and a little angry, how you went back and started again, trying hard to not be bored, trying hard to be smart, trying not to give up and re-read that Trevanian book instead.

    Don’t give me that shit about Faulkner being hard because there was that afternoon when you realized what the story was about, when you saw that the pattern of random rocks in the road was a secret code of musical notes scoring a symphony that only grew in richness over the span of years.

    Don’t give me that shit about Vonnegut, either, about how you read Breakfast of Champions at the age of sixteen when you were so depressed you wanted to kill yourself. Don’t tell me that reading that book made you decide to go to the hospital instead of jumping off the parking structure of the Pioneer Hotel. The part where you were going to be polite and wrap yourself in garbage bags so as not to make too much of a mess is pretty funny—irony—but I still don’t want to hear it.

    You know what? I don’t care. I don’t care what makes you want to do this thing. I am not interested in your ambitions to have people read your work. People read your work all the time, read it and like it.

    I’m not interested in your quest for a perfection you will never achieve, not interested in your heroes or even your opinions on truth, war, love, loss, fatherhood, death or any of it.

    So what, then? What interests me?

    I’ll tell you.

    It’s the act of writing. Writing every day, writing something. Think of the hummingbird. Think of the shark. Think of the way your heart is beating away in your chest at this very moment. No rest. Ever onward.

    Don’t give me your reasons. Don’t give me anything. Don’t think about it. Don’t think at all.

    Empty yourself out and get to it. You can think about it later.

    And by God, you probably will, too.


     

    Hawser

    IABS&R Volume 3 Selection

    hawescapes.com

     
    • A Journey With You 8:45 pm on April 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I love this!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rose Red 8:54 pm on April 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Holy crap. I feel like you kicked me in the teeth and patted my back at the same time. Thanks. Good stuff

      Liked by 4 people

    • lsm510 9:08 pm on April 29, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Heh. I’m getting more of the kicked in the teeth vibe. Maybe because I don’t manage the writing every day thing. I settle for once a week and might even slip up on that at times. Where is that parking garage and trash bag you were talking about? Honestly though, can this be a hobby? Pretty please?

      Liked by 2 people

    • J Hardy Carroll 4:04 am on April 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      My inner dialog is often pretty mean, but the voice is good. Sometimes I channel Lou Grant, maybe.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rose Red 12:15 pm on April 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Good old Lou, could count on him for tough love, or a snort of whiskey, at least

      Liked by 2 people

    • enkimoz 3:34 pm on April 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      So ‘just do it’ as you and Nike say. And do it without going through my litany of excuses? Aaargh.

      Liked by 2 people

  • Kurt Brindley 9:25 pm on April 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , blurbs, , , , novels, , , , , , , ,   

    So what do you think of this new description for Hercules Gone Mad that I’ve been working on? 

    So, about this new HGM description…it’s been long overdue. The last one (first one) was rather bare-boned and relied more on its association with the Heroes of Dystopia intro than on any deeper meaningful description of the book.

    So, I decided to put some meat on its bones, so to speak. Check it out below and let me know what you think in the comment section please.


     

    HERCULES GONE MAD Part One

    HERCULES GONE MAD – Book One of the HEROES OF DYSTOPIA Saga


     

    The man they call Hercules, a handle bestowed upon him while an elite warrior in the former military of the former leading World Power, struggles to maintain his sanity in a world no longer known to him, a world no longer known to anyone who has managed to survive the brutal collapse of its established order, or who is so unfortunate as to be immune to the bloody disease that has decimated the global population, or who has been captured, caged, and commoditized within a system formerly known as slavery but now is known as the market of human capital.

    However, it is not the insanity that has befallen the ruined world that is tormenting and degrading the former warrior’s mind – what is eating at his sanity is the suffering from the disgrace that has befallen him. For it is his belief that he has committed the most heinous act a military man of honor and integrity could possibly commit. And it is this belief that is driving him completely mad.

    As he struggles to survive the madness, Hercules must maneuver through all the evil raging around him, evil stoked by the continuing battle between the neo-collectivist revolutionaries committed to global utopia and the outlawed capitalist rebels committed to restoring a new version of the old order. As the war between the two political foes rage on, the De Borja Cartel, led by a zealot drug lord known as The Pope, seeks to leverage the chaos and extend its own corrupt domain northward.

    All the while, Santa Muerte, threatened by one powerful man’s proximity to the technological attainment of a god-like immortality, mobilizes to purge the earth of its remaining living souls once and for all so that she, at last, may attain her divine ascension.

    And yet nothing is as it seems…


    HEROES OF DYSTOPIA Introduction
    HERCULES GONE MAD Excerpt

     
     

     
    • bkraine 2:03 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds really, really interesting, and I am going to check out the Wattpad link. With that said, whoa those are some long sentences. Can you chop ’em up a little to give the readers a bit more of a breather than the commas provide?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kurt Brindley 2:06 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Ha ha…such is my curse of the overreaching sentence. That’s exactly the kind of feedback I’m looking for, bkraine. Thank you.

        Like

        • bkraine 2:22 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

          One of my beta readers for BLOOD TOY told me her main issue with my MS was paragraph long sentences. “There were quite a lot of those.” So now I have a nose for them lol.

          Liked by 1 person

    • K'lee L. 2:10 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Definitely like the sound and dark tone of this. I also will check out the Wattpad link to learn more. Congratulations, Kurt!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Laura L. 5:34 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I read it like it was a book cover flap of a book I randomly selected. I would read the book based on this and it isn’t my normal genre. It *might* be a tad long. I don’t know. I’m still thinking in terms of book flaps. I have a short attention span when it comes to those. The first paragraph was enough to draw me in, the rest was frosting, for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 11:50 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I think you’re right in terms of print books: this would probably be closest to a book flap write-up thingy. But for now this goes in Amazon’s book description slot, which, based upon my research of established writers’ book descriptions, can be either much shorter or much longer. I guess it all depends on the effectiveness of the writing. I also agree, as do other commenters, that it is a tad long. Will see what I can do to pare it down some….which is, as evident by many of my posts here, not my forte (which I recently learned is pronounced “fort” and not “fortay.” Anyway…) :)

        Thank you very much, LL!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Laura L. 8:56 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

          I don’t know who told you it isn’t for-tay, but they were wrong. It can be pronounced both ways, and in American English, fortay is preferred by the dictionaries I checked.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Kurt Brindley 9:24 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

            And irregardless has forced its way into acceptance too. :)

            Like

            • Laura L. 10:12 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink

              Uh, no. Just, no. I’m 56, grew up around educated people, parents were college, etc. I’ve always heard it fortay (with the little thing over the e). Pronouncing it Fortay is not new and so is not part of the “people are now using it like it is correct” thing, like (shudder) irregardless. Granted I’m not up on the etymology, but I’m going to stand pretty firm on “fortay” has always been acceptable, and possibly preferred in American English. (Have no idea what the UK gets up to.)

              Liked by 1 person

            • Kurt Brindley 8:14 am on April 20, 2015 Permalink

              Wow. Okay, okay…you win Queen of Etymology. I yield. :)

              Liked by 1 person

            • Laura L. 6:19 pm on April 20, 2015 Permalink

              :p

              Like

    • Hersey97 7:02 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      So hey, I’m a fellow Wattpadder, I have a completed book you might wanna see. It’s titled Lights. The user name is Itzhersey

      I don’t see what’s wrong with the sentences, I happen to really like them.

      I happen to have found a new book for my reading list.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 11:52 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Hey, cool. I’ll def check out your writing on Wattpad. Thank you for the intro and for the kind feedback, Hersey97.

        Liked by 1 person

    • PaulXylinides, May the mermaids sing to you ... 12:31 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Did you mean “blood disease” rather than “bloody disease?” (Hope so!) As to the rest, it struck me as too dense like a condensation – trying to get everything in rather than a tantalizing lead-in. To my mind, if you have to work at the synopsis, then the tendency is to avoid the main course as simply more work. Here’s my suggestion (sorry but you asked for this) that retains all the main points:

      Hercules struggles to maintain his sanity in a world no longer known to him, a world no longer known to anyone who has managed to survive the brutal collapse of its established order, or who is so unfortunate as to be immune to the blood disease that has decimated the global population, or who has been captured, caged, and commoditized within a system formerly known as slavery but now is known as the market of human capital.
      However, it is not the insanity that has befallen the ruined world that is tormenting and degrading the former warrior’s mind but the disgrace that has befallen him. For it is his belief that he has committed the most heinous act a military man of honor and integrity could possibly commit. And it is this belief that is driving him completely mad.
      As he struggles to survive the madness, Hercules must maneuver through all the evil raging around him, evil stoked by the continuing battle between the revolutionaries for global utopia and the rebels committed to restoring the capitalist order. As the war between the two political foes rages on, a zealot drug lord known as The Pope, seeks to leverage the chaos.
      All the while, Santa Muerte mobilizes to purge the earth of its remaining living souls once and for all so that she, at last, may attain her divine ascension.
      And yet nothing is as it seems…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:01 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Dude, I was so hoping you’d do something like this. I have the hardest time trying to write synopses. Off the top, I don’t see any major changes so I’ll take a closer read and hit you up via email if I have any follow up questions. Arigato!

        As for the disease, I meant bloody. Ebola would be a good example where one of the symptom is bleeding from the mouth, eyes, and other places. Blood disease sounds too neat for where I’m going.

        Like

        • PaulXylinides, May the mermaids sing to you ... 12:13 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

          You and me both – they can be done in so many ways. The temptation is always there not to leave out anything of the hard-fought story but often the result is a lot of underbrush. If this is intended as a blurb, it should obviously be much shorter. Be glad to hear from you. By the way, I like what painters do – trust the viewer to fill in gaps and make transitions.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Kurt Brindley 12:31 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

            Yeah man… Def not a back cover blurb thing. It’s more for Amazon’s book description slot. I like the painter imagery…

            Like

    • crafty theatre 1:23 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I’m reading it like it is aimed at what goes on the back cover of a book. If that is what you are aiming for, then consider a little less art and a little more sell. As in, long sentences work better within the pages and I think that you need to let the prospective buyer know what category of story it is s/he will get immediately. If the subject matter is appealing, the customer will purchase. Give an appertiser of your art/style with your blurb, not the main meal.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 12:06 pm on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you very much for that very helpful feedback, crafty theatre. Yeah, this would probably be closer to a book flap thing than a back cover blurb thing, if it were for a print book. Right now it’s targeted more for Amazon’s book description slot where I’ve found effective write-ups to be from a few sentences to several paragraphs. You are right that I have to give exactly what is needed to make the sell and I will try to trim this down a bit to get to that sweet spot like you recommend. Thanks again!

        Liked by 1 person

    • leebalanarts 8:00 pm on April 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Exciting — a really good outline (overview) for the novel. Great theme. I like the metaphor and mirror-image of mythology.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kurt Brindley 9:19 am on April 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Thank so much, leebalanarts. i really appreciate the feedback from such a creative and expressive soul as yourself.

        Like

  • Kurt Brindley 2:16 pm on April 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , novels, , , , reading apps, , , The Sea Is My Brother,   

    My most favoritest new reading app… 

    After you download and read all of my books and stories and write raving reviews of them at any bookstore you can find all throughout the internet land, I highly recommend you download the Overdrive app. It’s a great way to read ebooks and, what I like best about it, listen to audiobooks for free, all while supporting your local library…or whatever library for which you happen to have a valid library card.

    Click to enlarge

    Click to enlarge

    It’s a piece of carrot cake to use. Just download it to your phone, create your account, search for your library, plug in your library card number and both presto and voila, you’ll be reading or listening to books in no time.

    And if you’re not into the whole smartphone thingy, you can do it all online right here.

    And speaking of libraries, if you haven’t already – and I’m pretty sure you already have – how about petitioning your library to stock my books?

    Hey, awesome, thanks dude*.

    Yours truly rockin' the audiobook THE SEA IS MY BROTHER, a novel by Jack Kerouac on his favoritist newest app Overdrive

    Yours truly rockin’ the audiobook version of THE SEA IS MY BROTHER, a posthumously published novel by Jack Kerouac, on my most favoritist new app

     

    *non-gender specific

     
     

     
    • Russell J. Fellows 2:21 pm on April 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Love Overdrive. Use it all the time to listen to audiobooks while I work. It helps pass the time.

      Liked by 1 person

    • 2015chronicles 5:07 pm on April 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Been using this app for quite a few years. Great time saver, when the books I want to read are available through Overdrive.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jason c. segarra 12:19 am on April 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Just installed it and can’t wait to look through and see what they have available. Thanks for sharing this!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth Anne Mitchell 10:05 pm on April 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I love, love, Overdrive. As others have mentioned, it’s great for ebooks and audiobooks. Also, my local library plugs into a regional consortium, so there are sooooo many books to choose from.

      Like

  • Kurt Brindley 2:40 pm on April 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , novels, , , , ,   

    Why We Are Here 

    Coming Soon

    HERCULES GONE MAD: Part Two
    LEAVE & Other Stories Short & Shorter


    It seems that some of you may actually think this blog is now about dogs and ramen. It’s not. That post about dogs and ramen was an April Fools’ prank. This blog has been and will continue to be all about books and writing in general and Kurt’s books and writing in particular. Right on?

    Write On!

     
     

     
  • Kurt Brindley 10:25 am on March 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Hawser, , , , , John Hardy Carroll, novels, pilots, , ,   

    Let’s give it a go, shall we… 

    I wasn’t planning on committing myself to another IABS&R round just yet; however, I made the mistake of picking up Indie Author J. Hardy Carroll’s novel HAWSER to casually leaf through it during a rare fit of nothing-to-do-ness. Well, you know how it goes – one thing page led to another and before I knew it I was hooked. Carroll gives us a very strong opening that pulled me right into the vibe of the story.

    So, since there’s not much chance that I am not going to read Carroll’s book, we might as well go ahead and make it all official-like and call this the official IABS&R VOLUME 3 KICK-OFF post and away we go…

    Any books that mysteriously appear in my post office box henceforth will be shelved until we complete this round and move on to IABS&R Volume 4.

    I know, I know…I still have essays to write from my first commitment to Emerson. But, as I am not going to do any further Emerson reading until I feel I’ve said all I have to say about Nature, I am in need of something to read (other than the gore and bore of the daily news) so Carroll’s apparently interesting novel fills that void nicely.

    If anyone else has reviewed or intends to review HAWSER, please let me know. I’d like to check it out and maybe reblog it here.

    Righto, then. Off I go…

    Wish me luck!

    (It better be good, JHC…)
     

    Hawser-bookcover

    IABS&R Volume 3 Announcement
    hawesescapes.com
    Amazon

     
     

     
  • Kurt Brindley 8:38 am on March 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , city photography, , Joseph Heller, , novels, ,   

    Caption This! no.1 

    Catch 22 Saloon

    Your caption could be here


     

    I saw this today while cruising Eastern Baltimore.

    Many thoughts came to mind when I saw it.

    However, I thought it would be fun to see what comes to your mind when seeing it.

    Post your caption in the comment section.

    Caption with the most “Likes” win.

    Picture will be posted tonight with winning caption and a link to the winner’s website.

    Have fun!

     
     

     
  • Kurt Brindley 9:22 pm on February 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , genre fiction, , , novels, , , , , ,   

    theliteraryreader ~ Reviews of the written word 

    Our good friend in literature and life, Paul Xylinides, author of the powerful and finely crafted novel THE WILD HORSES OF HIROSHIMA, among other works, has taken on the noble challenge of standing up a literary review site that I encourage each of you to visit regularly and enjoy.

    The site is called theliteraryreader ~ Reviews of the written word and you can find it at theliteraryreader.com.

    So please join me in congratulating Paul on this new adventure of his and thank him for furthering the recognition and advancement of the written word.

    Congratulations, Paul, and may you enjoy a success such that we all may be rewarded and enlightened by it.
     

    Liked by 1 person

    theliteraryreader

    book-cover-sea-trials-300x450

    The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor by Kurt Brindley

    Review by Paul Xylinides

    paul_picture_03

    Kurt Brindley joins forces with Herman Melville

    Before I begin this review, let me first recommend to anyone whom it persuades to read The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor, that after doing so they further benefit themselves by looking again at their copy of Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, Sailor that I shall, however, quote from extensively. Kurt Brindley’s accomplishment should come into even greater focus when looked at through the lens of the nineteenth century classic novel.

    Anyone who has ever experienced the injustice of being condemned by those who characterize their sensitivities in ways fundamentally at odds with their true identity will respond deeply to the travails of Kurt Brindley”s protagonist in The Sea Trials of an Unfortunate Sailor. From a tellingly different perspective the same fate befalls Melville’s hero. One cannot help but…

    View original post 1,351 more words

     
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