Tag Archives: indie publishing

So, I’m Going To Make A Movie… UPDATE #3

We Have Our Captain!

I am pleased and honored to announce that we have found/been blessedly bestowed with a Director for our film LEAVE.

With a captain now at our film’s helm (yes, I do love my sailing metaphors), we will soon be launching our Indiegogo funding campaign, where we will happily and proudly announce all Cast & Crew.

Even once the Indiegogo campaign launches, we will continue to run our website funding campaign here for those Indie Authors and other Indie Creator-types who would rather receive one of the Reward Packages as a donation incentive to promote their books or other projects versus the incentives that will be offered with the Indiegogo campaign.

To be notified when the Indiegogo campaign goes live, please sign up here.

To learn more about the website funding campaign and how you can promote your books or other projects, please visit here.

To go ahead and just donate now, please do so here.

After you donate via the website campaign, you should be automatically directed to a page where you can select your Reward Package. If you are not directed to the page, please let me know and I will personally assist you.

Right on?

Write on!


PLEASE SUPPORT ALL THOSE WHO SUPPORT OUR FILM.

YOU MAY BE ALSO INTERESTED IN:

So I’m going to make a movie…
So I’m going to make a movie… UPDATE #1
So I’m going to make a movie… UPDATE #2

 
 

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Need Help Publishing Your Book?

 
Inspired by a love of literature in specific and “The Arts” in general, as well as our very own Indie Author Book Selection & Review (IABS&R), it is my pleasure to introduce you to a long in planning yet new venture of mine, a venture of which is in possession of the entrepreneurial name of PROSOCHĒ (pronounced pro-so-hi) as legally registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of the United States of America and which is now open for business to all those of a literary nature world-wide.

In other words, I’ve founded a Literary Consultancy gig and I cordially invite you to consider my services as an option for expanding and enhancing your authorial endeavors.

Admittedly, in its present state the website is rather understated in looks and overstated in words, but it does embody that which I wish to convey and present to the world at this time.

And, as in much if not most of life, it is subject to change.

You can visit the site to learn all about it – like what in the heck does PROSOCHĒ even mean – but here are a couple key points I’d like to highlight for you right now:

– Long term I hope for PROSOCHĒ to be a full-scale Creativity Consultancy firm, catering to all “The Arts.” But as of the moment, it employs just yours truly and I am able to offer Literary Consultancy services in the form of manuscript proofing, editing, and other such things that can be found on the website.

– While I found that manuscript proofing and editing services can run into the thousands of dollars, I’ll be honest, I don’t really know what my services are worth at this time. I do believe I can provide some value, however, as is attested to by the testimonials found on the site, and I do believe it is worth a fee of some sort; but until I figure it all out, I am accepting as a fee whatever it is my select clientele, perhaps you, choose to pay.

I did mention that things are subject to change, right? Well the fee structure certainly will, and I imagine soon, so please keep that in mind if considering the services.

I also mentioned at the beginning of this post that PROSOCHĒ was partially inspired by the IABS&R. That inspiration came not so much from what has been advertised about the IABS&R here or from the reviews I have written in response to the selected texts; the inspiration came from that part of the IABS&R which you probably aren’t aware of, which is an email I send to the IABS&R authors that consist of detailed and expansive feedback of contextual, proofing, and editing recommendations based upon my close reading of the text. I believe these emails have been of more value to the authors than either the exposure they’ve received through this site or the reviews of their work I post here or elsewhere.

So, in addition to a deep understanding of the ins and outs of the world Indie Publishing, that is the crux of what I bring to PROSOCHĒ: my ability to give a manuscript a close read and provide its author a deep and extensive critique of it.

So, please check PROSOCHĒ out if you feel so inclined and just maybe we can work together on a project of yours.

Now, with the advent of PROSOCHĒ, does it mean the end for the IABS&R? The answer is most certainly not. In fact, I am getting ready to kick off Volume IV as I am already in receipt of three books – you’ll be seeing the Book Reveal posts of them very soon so if you’d like your hard copy book to be entered in this volume you better send it to me pronto as my selection will be in a month or so.

As always, there’s a lot going on, of which I am very happy and even more thankful for.

If you have any questions about PROSOCHĒ, please let me know about them by contacting me through the site’s Contact Page.

Thank you and, as always…

Write On!


PROSOCHĒ

The Art of Attention

Our MissionOur ServicesOur FeesOur TeamOur Free Initial ConsultationOur Blog

 
 

At least when the robots take over they will be much quicker in rejecting one of my stories…

Robot Editor

You know, seeing how we already have robots writing poetry and composing music, I assume we will soon have robots taking over as reviewers and editors, as well.

I yearn for that day…

You see, months and months ago — essentially an eternity in our hyper-paced, brain-frazzling, tele-connected, continually-morphing-right-before-our-eyes day and age — in an effort to enhance (establish?) my writing cred, I submitted a couple short stories to various literary journals in the hope that they will get selected to be published so that when I self-publish my short story collection I can add a highfalutin aside within the book’s front matter that gives a self-congratulatory thank you to these literary journals for their wisdom and insight in selecting my work to be published.

Can ya dig?

I bet you can…

As I’m sure you suspect, I subject myself to the subjective and contrary literary values of these human reviewers and editors because, just between you and me, I (like most other self-published authors I suspect) would like to someday be an unself-published author and be recognized as a “real writer” within the old slow (really, really slow) world of traditional publishing. (A good read on the question of whether one should self-publish or not can be found here.)

But man* let me tall ya that from all the brain-scattering hyperlinking/twittering/buzzfeeding** I’m now addicted to, I’ve become a very impatient man***, which is why back in 2011, after experiencing how long it took agent after agent to reject my highly exceptional queries (that, and because back then I wasn’t sure I would be of this world too much longer) I began all this ego-degrading self-publishing and self-marketing nonsense in the first place.

And which is why now, months and months after submitting my highly exceptional short stories to these good-fortuned literary journals I am getting extremely impatient with their less than expeditious responses and am once again beginning to rethink my strategy for literary fame and wealth, all of which is causing me to consider withdrawing my submissions and just go ahead and publish the damn short story collection minus the self-congratulatory front matter aside.

Big sigh

Anyway

Off I go to my Submittable account for the third time this morning to see if the status of any of my submissions have magically changed to something other than “In-Progress.” At this point, I would celebrate even a status of “Declined” just so I can move on in certitude and vigor.

And, while I’m (over-)indulging in my self-inflicted publishing pain at Sumbittable, I invite you to indulge in a short piece of mine that was actually selected to be published by a highly respected (at least by me) though highly unknown independent publisher, and which can be found by click clicking right here.

Right on?

Yeah, write on…


 
*non-gender specific
**included for dramatic purposes only – I’ve never actually been on buzzfeed…no, really
***gender specific

 
 

HEAVY BAGS OF SOUL by K.D. Rose: An IABS&R Volume IV Book Reveal

I’m very happy to say that we have yet another submission to ponder over for Volume IV of the Indie Author Book Selection & Review. And by what I’ve seen of the book so far, it appears to be quite the submission, indeed. And I’m very very happy to say that this may not even be the last volume submission. I have it on good authority from Author Erica Miles that I just may receive yet one more book prior to August 8, 2015, our cutoff date for submissions to this volume. And if by chance it, or any other book submission for that matter, doesn’t make it by our cutoff date – no worries, we’ll just include for the next volume.

But regardless whether we get to check out Erica’s book in this volume or the next, you can check out what she has going on right now at authorericamilesblog.wordpress.com.


It is now my pleasure to present to you…

Rose-package
 

Rose-front

I’m always humbled and very appreciative of the kind notes and inscriptions you all write for me in the books you send my way. I wish I would have (because I certainly should have) mentioned it before. However, along with the book K.D. Rose sent me, I received not only a very nice hand-written note (handwriting is such a rare occurrence anymore that in and of itself deserves acknowledging), but also one very cool diddy of an inscription that goes a little like this:

To Kurt:

You can say you got a masterpiece for free —
Then toss it in the garbage.
How Zen is that?!

– KD Rose

Oh yeah – very Zen.

So Zen, in fact, I shall clap in honor of its Zen-ness with one hand.
 

KD Rose Book Reveal

From the back cover:


It is half past dark and we are in a graveyard orbit. Travelers have lost their way. Mankind is hard of hearing. We have abandoned insight and revelation for commerce and merry-go-rounds of distraction. But wonder is still in the palm of our hand. Wisdom is everywhere when we pay attention. We hold the key to orchards in camouflage and we are charged with the task of taking vision and making it into reality–beyond anything that exists and beyond what others say can be done. Learning this is an absolute requirement to survival.

WHAT YOU DO NEXT, IS UP TO YOU.


All I have to say about that is…
Whoa…
 

Rose-flat

Rose-spine

Aesthetically speaking, HEAVY BAGS OF SOUL is a very eye-appealing book and there is a lot of mystery and intrigue going on with its cover; which is good because I suspect there is a lot of the same going on with its content, as well. Flipping through its pages I see poetry and stories and what looks to be asides of this and that. I can’t say for sure yet which book will be the selection for this volume but I can say for sure that this book has definitely captured my interest…


 


 

 

Stay tuned for K.D. Rose’s Guest Post — it’s gonna be a good one…

 
 

THE CREATOR OF BEAUTIFUL THINGS: A Guest Post by Author G.N. Boorse

 

Oscar Wilde, in his famous preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray begins, “The artist is the creator of beautiful things.” But I’ve been struggling to understand what he means by that.

Do all artists create beauty? Are all of those who create beauty artists?

E. L. James recently published another book in the Fifty Shades of Grey series, merely titled Grey—the story as told by Christian Grey himself, and not through Anastasia’s eyes. According to the Los Angeles Times, following the first four days after its release, Grey had already sold 1.1 million copies, so her publisher printed a few million more.

Yet we cannot attribute James’ success to a particular artistry or cleverness with words. She appeals to the baser desires of the public, and they snap at the bait. Grey is a butchery of the English literary arts, but it sells copies.

Meanwhile the rest of the writers struggle to chain three words together in the hopes that they might find something beautiful, that their words resonate deeply from the heart. And in the rare event that beauty occurs and blooms like a violet in a pit of mud, it falls unnoticed by the wayside.

I’m not saying that you can’t find good writing on the New York Times bestseller list. I’m just saying you’ll have to look very hard.

Elizabeth Gilbert, bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love commented in a TED talk on questions she’d been asked by fans as to what she was going to do now that she’d met with some success in her creative endeavors. In her talk, which is well worth listening to, she explains a fear that so many writers and creative people have—that either the best of their art is behind them or that they will never reach their full potential.

The pressure to improve, the burden of producing something marketable—these things hold back the artist like a bit restrains a horse. Try to write something beautiful and the dining room table goes empty while estimated retail value determines the speed, direction, and content of dime novels. No money, no bread. But if there isn’t a dollar in art, where does the industry fall? Places like Christian Grey’s apartment, I would assume.

So is there hope for the modern publishing industry? When will excellence win out?

Honestly, I don’t know, but we as both readers and writers have a duty to pursue the unmarketable art. Prose that speaks from the depths of the soul. Quality; not light reads. The involved reading projects, the memoirs and novels and elaborate space operas that maybe no one will ever pick up other than the writer’s girlfriend and his parents.

Gilbert suggests that we channel a creative genius greater than ourselves, and Wilde remarks, “It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors.” Bare your souls, artists, and pen not the shallower mass-produced stock. Instead weave your own story on the page, heeding not the agents and presses and houses and focus groups that expect the same plot canned and recanned in shiny packaging. Dare to write selfishly, for the satisfaction of the artist and not the critic. Slave away years on a single sentence to make it perfect or jot down a novel and keep it that way.

But don’t ever feel that you have to write to please the people. It couldn’t matter less whether they get the bigger picture or not: popularity isn’t the goal. Don’t mimic E. L. James to collect Twitter followers.

You are a writer and an artist, and your job is to make something beautiful.


G.N. Boorse is a writer and blogger currently living in the central part of New Jersey. He recently published his first book, Don’t Touch the Glass, on March 3, 2015. Other works of his have been featured in numerous places online. You can learn more about the author at his website asotherswere.me.
 

 
 

Summertime Blues – A Call for Guest Contributors

I read an article a good while back about a study that concluded that we humans tend to be more productive and creative during cooler weather periods than warmer weather periods. Now, I cannot speak to the veracity of the study; however, I can speak to the fact that from now (and maybe even sooner) until the end of summer, if not longer, yours truly will be significantly less productive and creative.

Consequently, in an effort to, if not cure, than at least offset my summertime productive blues, I ask for your assistance. I am asking all you Indie-types, be you an author, artist, photographer, whatever, to contribute a guest post to this blog discussing what it has been like for you to self-publish your work.

You are free to discuss your creative process, the logistical process, the publishing process, or whatever process you have gained insight to during your Indie experience that you feel will both interest and instruct us, and, ultimately, improve and enhance our own future Indie efforts.

Oh, and while you are at it, don’t forget to pitch to us the final product of your creative effort (book, artwork, photography, etc.) for which you wish us to purchase.

You can email me your submission through the Contact page and we’ll work together from there to get it posted.

The more submissions, the merrier. I expect it to be a long, hot unproductive summer for me so I hope you all are willing to help me to keep this blog active and interesting throughout.

Please include links to any pictures or products you’d like to include in your post and I’ll format them to your liking.

Our first guest author post in this series is by author Jason Greensides and it will be up tomorrow evening, Inshallah. In the interim, you can check out Jason’s work at jasongreensides.com.

Let me know if you have any questions.

And let the long lazy hazy unproductive days of summer begin!

Right on?

Write on!