THE GOOD KILL – A Review by Joan Wiley

I would like to thank Joan Wiley firstly for requesting a copy of THE GOOD KILL during my summer giveaway, and then secondly for sharing an ever so eloquent and enthusiastic review of it with her website audience and elsewhere.

And, while we’re on the subject of Ms. Wiley, I would also like to congratulate her on the recent release of her debut horror anthology VILLAINOUS MINDS. Go check it out, my friends… after first checking out her review of my book, of course.

Right on?

Write on!

Hello Friends.

I was given the opportunity to read “The Good Kill” written by author, Kurt Brindley. I don’t usually do book reviews on this blog, but due to Mr. Brindley generously giving me a copy to review on Amazon, I wanted to share my thoughts with any followers here on WordPress as well.

The book tells a fascinating tale, which follows the story of Killian Lebon, an ex- Navy Seal who dives head first into the dark and dirty underworld of kingpins, killers, drugs and sex trafficking.

This is a gritty read depicting a realistic and disturbing world. I would say this is not for those faint of heart, but then again…it would serve as an eye opener for the masses to realize the tragic truth of these terrible things occurring all over the world. More vigilance and awareness of the sex trafficking trade and drug cartel is needed.

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Arthouse Films in general are nutty…

But Arthouse Horror Films are, if you’d excuse the vernacular…

Off the mother fn nutty hook, yo.

And thank god for that.

Been on an arthouse horror film binge lately from a dire and desperate need (yeah, I like redundancies so what of it?) to clear the palate of that rancid franchise aftertaste.

Watched this lovely gem last night and I hope someday when I grow up I will be able to create something so horror(-fully?)(-ibly?) masterful…

Continue reading “Arthouse Films in general are nutty…”

THE LESSER DEAD by Christopher Buehlman — A Review

BOOK | FICTION | HORROR
THE LESSER DEAD
CHRISTOPHER BUEHLMAN
AUDIOBOOK
RATING: ★ ★ ★ ★


The secret is, vampires are real and I am one.
The secret is, I’m stealing from you what is most truly yours and I’m not sorry… 


New York City in 1978 is a dirty, dangerous place to live. And die. Joey Peacock knows this as well as anybody—he has spent the last forty years as an adolescent vampire, perfecting the routine he now enjoys: womanizing in punk clubs and discotheques, feeding by night, and sleeping by day with others of his kind in the macabre labyrinth under the city’s sidewalks.

The subways are his playground and his highway, shuttling him throughout Manhattan to bleed the unsuspecting in the Sheep Meadow of Central Park or in the backseats of Checker cabs, or even those in their own apartments who are too hypnotized by sitcoms to notice him opening their windows. It’s almost too easy.

Until one night he sees them hunting on his beloved subway. The children with the merry eyes. Vampires, like him…or not like him. Whatever they are, whatever their appearance means, the undead in the tunnels of Manhattan are not as safe as they once were.

And neither are the rest of us.

Amazon Book Description
Continue reading “THE LESSER DEAD by Christopher Buehlman — A Review”

Alter

Yeah, I DNF most horror films because, let’s face it, most horror films are crap…

But last night I watched a rather decent one written and directed by Irish/Welsh film maker Liam Gavin called A DARK SONG.

A determined young woman and a damaged occultist risk their lives and souls to perform a dangerous ritual that will grant them what they want.
Continue reading “Alter”

LAST DAYS by Brian Evenson — A Reluctant Review

BOOK | FICTION | HORROR
LAST DAYS BY BRIAN EVENSON
RATING: ★ ★

I had been looking hard for a killer horror noir novel ever since reading FALLING ANGEL by William Hjortsberg, a stellar benchmark of the sub-genre that is in close competition for greatness with ANGEL HEART, its movie adaptation starring Mickey Rourke.

I eventually came across a couple of pretty good lists of horror noir books and found that LAST DAYS was high on both of them.

In Last Days I thought for sure I had a ringer.

And then when I began reading Peter Straub’s introduction for it there was absolutely no doubt in my mind that it was going to be the absolutely best horror noir book I had ever read.

Continue reading “LAST DAYS by Brian Evenson — A Reluctant Review”

Building 51 By Jennifer L. Place – A Lee Hall Review

By way of reblogging this very well-written and intriguing review of Jennifer L. Place’s amazing sounding book, one of which I will def put on my “Want to Read” list as soon as I finish up here, I’d like to introduce you to my new friend Lee Hall, the author of this very well-written review.

Lee was kind enough to respond to my call for Indie Author recommendations and I am the better man for it. Not only am I now aware of Jennifer’s horror novel which I look forward to reading very much as it seems to be right in my wheelhouse, I am now aware of Lee’s fantastic website full of other such well-written and intriguing Indie Author book reviews; and, just as important if not more so, I am now aware of his own fine-looking list of what I am sure to be deep, verisimilitude-inducing reads, particularly his book Teleporter which is about a twenty-something slacker turned superhero, and which is now def on my “Want to Read” list:


 

 

So do yourself a favor and check out Lee’s website chock full of wonderful things that are sure to pleasure the discerning reader…

And do me a favor by letting me know what other awesome Indie Author books I should be reading…

Lee's Hall of information

Urban exploration horror filled with tension and some truth…

51

Building 51 follows the events of seven friends as they embark on an exploration excursion. Their destination the Hudson River State Hospital for the Insane; a real place with a real history that can be described as harrowing to say the least.

Exploration of abandoned places is a specialist niche in the genre of horror and one which I very much enjoy. Films such as ‘Grave encounters’ and ‘House on Haunted Hill’ come to mind but in terms of books, Building 51 is the benchmark and makes for a roller coaster tension filled read.

Fusing elements of real history and the paranormal make this story and the characters in it feel like something is lurking and watching them. Something is and this gradually becomes apparent manifesting itself in a range of unique and creepy ways.

The overall flow of the book…

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Midsommar Review

So, I’m reblogging this Midsommar movie review by Michael Van Zanten (cool name) for two reasons…

The first reason is because it is a very will-written and informative review for a movie that I am very interested in seeing.

The second reason is because Michael, the author of the review, regards the director Ari Aster as an “auteur” — high praise indeed — and I wonder, can a director who has released only two feature films, with the second only being just released and still yet mostly unseen by the general movie going public, be deserving of such high praise as auteur?

My instincts tell me no, that two movies aren’t enough to put him up there with the likes of the greats such as Wells, Kubrick, Bigelow, Lee, Hitchcock, Kurosawa and others who truly were/are the auteurs – the authors – of the movies they created.

But to me a director is not deserving of the honor just for having such an influence on his or her own movies. To me, he or she must have such an influence on the entire industry.

But that’s just my opinion and what do I know? I’m just an old guy probably a bit too suspicious of the present and far too overprotective of the past…

But seriously, go ahead and check out this review of Michael’s I’m reblogging here and all the other reviews of his. He has a great site.

Film Sentinel

midsommar4.0.jpgHorror has a new name, and that name is Ari Aster. After possessing the minds of Sundance-goers with his unsettling directorial debut Hereditary in 2018, the auteur’s breakout hit enjoyed a wide release under A24 and turned out to be the most profitable release ever under the label. Now only one year later, A24 is banking on the director once again to disturb viewers with Midsommar, Aster’s horrific follow-up centered on a Swedish Pagan death cult. Midsommar definitely isn’t for everyone, but it’s a magnificent and refined piece of distressing cinema, and further evidence the genre has a new king.

Unleashed to unsuspecting theater patrons in June of last year, Hereditary shunned popular horror conventions in favor of scares that were more psychological in nature. While there were still instances of common genre tropes such as Ouija boards and demonic possession, they were present in a script that was…

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Any Fans?

House of Leaves

 

Been wanting to read this for a long time but now that I finally have it…

I find its presence rather… intimidating.
 

#prayforthetimidreaders

 

 

Calling all fans of creepy suspense… | A Guest Post by Author Timothy G. Huguenin

Calling all fans of creepy suspense, small-town horror, and dystopian fiction!

My name is Timothy G. Huguenin (but let’s cut the pretense here—just call me Tim). I just launched When the Watcher Shakes, a dark suspense novel about a mysterious religious sect hidden in the isolated mountains of West Virginia. It’s such an important story to me because it’s representative of my own spiritual and personal journey, and it’s also set in the same beloved mountains where I grew up. I want to share it with you guys through Kurt’s blog, because he’s all about relationships and characters, and though it’s something of a genre story, I wanted to focus heavily on the characters residing in this cult and how their leader’s lies affect each person differently. The story is kind of a mix of Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines series, my life experiences, and Orwell’s 1984.

Here is a nutshell version of the book to whet your appetite:

The walls were meant to keep evil out—but they only hid the evil within.

John has given up his ordinary life to find wisdom traveling the country and enjoy the freedom of living as a nomad. But when he stumbles across a mysterious town tucked away in the Appalachian Mountains, walled off from modern society, he discovers a group of people who could use some freedom of their own. Are they a harmless religious sect, or is there something less benign underneath the surface?

The townspeople are initially wary of their new visitor, but as John questions their way of life, some of them begin to have questions of their own. As the leadership’s tight control unravels, men and women break free from the chains of legalism–some literally, and some at the cost of their own lives.

The best thing about this story? The Kindle version is free until Sunday. So get on over to Amazon and check it out!

I’d love to have you visit my website, tghuguenin.com. Come on over and let’s get to know each other.


 

tghuguenin.com

 


I would like to thank Tim for his donation in support of my movie making endeavors and for sharing the news of the launch of his debut novel with us. Please take the time to check out Tim’s site and his writing and support him in his efforts.